Vamping the Stage: Female Voices of Asian Modernities – Edited by Andrew N. Weintraub and Bart Barendregt

Vamping the Stage: Female Voices of Asian Modernities

Discussion published by Andrew Weintraub on Wednesday, July 26, 2017
I would like to announce the publication of Vamping the Stage: Female Voices of Asian Modernities, the first book-length study of women, modernity, and popular music in Asia (University of Hawai’i Press, 2017). Consisting of a lengthy introduction and 14 case studies, this edited volume demonstrates how female performers supported, challenged, and transgressed gendered norms in the entertainment industries of China, Japan, India, Indonesia, Iran, Korea, Malaysia, and the Philippines. Placing women’s voices in social and historical contexts, the authors explore salient discourses, representations, meanings, and politics of “voice” in Asian popular music.  Female performers were not merely symbols of times that were rapidly changing. Nor were they simply the personification of global historical changes. Female entertainers, positioned at the margins of intersecting fields of activities, created something hitherto unknown: they were artistic pioneers of new music, new cinema, new forms of dance and theater, and new behavior, lifestyles, and morals. They were active agents in the creation of local performance cultures, of a newly emerging mass culture, and the rise of a region-wide and globally oriented entertainment industry.
Edited by Andrew N. Weintraub and Bart Barendregt
Table of Contents

CHAPTER 1

Re-Vamping Asia: Women, Music, and Modernity in Comparative Perspective

Andrew N. Weintraub and Bart Barendregt

PART I

Triumph and Tragedies of the Colonized Voice: Colonial Modernity, Commodification,
and Circulation of Women’s Voices

CHAPTER 2

Acoustic Ladies: Mediating Audiovisual Modernity in Early German and Chinese Talkies

Yiman Wang

CHAPTER 3

On Becoming Nora: Transforming the Voice and Place of the Sing-Song Girl through Zhou Xuan

Yifen Beus

CHAPTER 4

Malay Women Singers of Colonial Malaya: Voicing Alternative Gender Identity and Modernity

Tan Sooi Beng

CHAPTER 5

The “Comfort Women” and the Voices of East Asian Modernity

Joshua D. Pilzer

PART II

Modern Stars and Modern Lives: Nation, Memory, and the Politics of Gender

CHAPTER 6

Diva Misora Hibari as Spectacle of Postwar Japan’s Modernity

Christine R. Yano

CHAPTER 7

Titiek Puspa: Gendered Modernity in 1960s and 1970s Indonesian Popular Music

Andrew N. Weintraub

CHAPTER 8

The Remarkable Career of L. R. Eswari

Amanda Weidman

PART III

Silenced Voices and Forbidden Modernities: Censorship, Morality, and National Identity

CHAPTER 9

Gendered and Censored Modernity: Two Female Singers and Their Music in South Korea

Soojin Kim

CHAPTER 10

Princess Siti and the Particularities of Post-Islamist Pop

Bart Barendregt

CHAPTER 11

Googoosh’s Voice: An Iranian Icon in Silence and Song

Farzaneh Hemmasi

PART IV

Body Politics and Discourses of Femininity: Image, Sexuality, and the Body

CHAPTER 12

Enacting Modernity through Voice, Body, and Gender: Filipina Singers from the Close of the Philippine-American War to the Onset of Martial Law (1913–1972)

Ricardo D. Trimillos

CHAPTER 13

Beyond Black and Gray: Portraits and Scenes of Javanese Singer Waldjinah in Indonesian Popular Print Media

Russell P. Skelchy

CHAPTER 14

Mainstreaming Dance Music and Articulating Femininity: South Korean Dance Divas in the 1980s

Hee-sun Kim

CHAPTER 15

The Ideal Idol: Making Music with Hatsune Miku, the “First Sound of the Future” 320

Jennifer Milioto Matsue

For further information:

http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/p-9840-9780824869861.aspx

ISBN: 978-0-8248-6986-1

372 pp.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s