[Cfp] CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS: SINOPHONE MUSICAL WORLDS AND THEIR PUBLICS

http://www.cefc.com.hk/china-perspectives/submissions/call-sinophone-musical-worlds-publics/

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS: SINOPHONE MUSICAL WORLDS AND THEIR PUBLICS

 Call for contributions China Perspectives / Perspectives chinoises

 

Sinophone Musical Worlds and their Publics

 

Guest editor: Dr Nathanel Amar, postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities at the University of Hong Kong

 

Photograph by Elaine Ip for The Week Hong Kong, 2017

Download PDF File here:  Call for abstracts CP China musical worlds

Recent success of Chinese reality television singing competitions broadcasted on national television or streamed directly on the internet, has shown the extent of musical genres represented in the Chinese world, from pop to folk via hip-hop or rock ’n’ roll. The popularity of new musical styles up to then considered as deviant as well as the recent attempts of the State to intervene directly on musical contents, tend to blur the distinctions between “mainstream” (流行) music, “popular” (民间) music as non-official, “underground” (地下) music or even “alternative” (另类) music. This call for papers aims at promoting a better understanding of the transformations of Chinese “musical worlds”, in the sense that Becker gave to “art worlds”, which stresses the role of cooperation and interactions between the different actors of the artistic sphere. As Becker wrote, “all artistic work, like all human activity, involves the joint activity of a number, often a large number, of people. Through their cooperation, the artwork we eventually see or hear comes to be and continues to be. The work always shows signs of that cooperation” (Becker, 2008: 1). We thus welcome contributions which take into consideration the necessary cooperation between individuals, allowing the constitution of musical worlds.

This call for papers wishes to approach the political management of popular music and its paradox. For instance, the Chinese authorities have indeed tried to co-opt marginal or ethnic minorities artists on national television or by producing their albums, such as the nationalist rap collective CD-Rev whose songs are produced by the Youth League, or the Uyghur folk singer Perhat Khaliq, celebrated on the popular TV show “The Voice of China”. However, at the same time, the authorities went after hip-hop culture after the so-called “hip-hop ban” of January 2018, or even imprisoned popular musicians as the “Xinjiang Justin Bieber”, Ablajan Awut Ayup, incarcerated since February 2018. We also welcome contributions which analyze the use of music and music-video by the organs of government propaganda, such as the multiplication of music-videos to promote the “Belt and Road Initiative” – the most recent was made by the People’s Daily using the music of a famous Coca-Cola advertisement of the 70s – or in the recent past to celebrate international events, as the Olympic Games of 2008 or the Shanghai International Expo of 2010.

In this special issue of China Perspectives, we would like to rethink the role of music in Chinese society. If the intervention of the Party-State is essential, it is necessary to raise the question of the public. How and where do people consume music? What is the relationship between music and the construction of subjectivity in contemporary China? We invite submissions focusing on the public and spaces of popular music and the meanings the audience gives to the activity of listening to music; we thus strongly encourage submissions which use an ethnographic approach. The papers can focus on precise case studies, for instance Karaoke consumption (Fung, 2010), dancing and singing in public spaces, or the transformation of popular opera.

This special issue will also represent an opportunity to analyze Chinese musical worlds beyond the national boundary of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) by considering the relations and influences of other parts of the sinophone world, such as Taiwan and Hong Kong, without forgetting the territories at the margins of the PRC like Xinjiang, Tibet or Inner Mongolia. The use of the term “sinophone”, as coined by Shu-mei Shih, allows us to investigate musical worlds outside the national territory of the PRC, but also the cultures of “minority peoples who have acquired or are forced to acquire the standard Sinitic languages of Mandarin, often at the expense of their native language” (Shu, 2013: 3) residing on Chinese soil.

We welcome contributions from any discipline focusing on popular music and encourage the inclusion of visual material. We are also open to non-academic papers as scene reports or photographic reports.

We welcome proposals, but by no means exclusively, exploring the following topics:

  • Opposition and crossing from the underground to the mainstream
  • Listening, dancing and singing together in contemporary China
  • Political uses of popular music
  • Music and the construction of identities
  • Musical influences and local adaptations
  • Music, the public sphere and uses of the past
  • Metamorphosis, structures and actors of the Chinese musical industry
  • Censorship and its circumvention, uses of propaganda
  • Music medium (radio, TV, internet, magazines, music schools)

 

For those who are interested, please send abstracts (between 300 and 500 words) to Nathanel Amar <namar@hku.hk> before 31 October 2018.

 

Format of abstracts and articles

Abstracts (written in English or in French) should be 300-500 words long, submitted by 31 October 2018.

Research articles (written in English or in French) should be 8,000 words long, and follow the format of articles guidelines available here. They will follow a double blind academic peer-review process.

“Current Affairs” articles, based on the latest developments in the Chinese music scenes, should be 4,000 words long.

Schedule of publication: full articles should be submitted by 15 February 2019 for publication of the special issue in the winter 2019.

 

About the journal China Perspectives / Perspectives chinoises

China Perspectives / Perspectives chinoises is an interdisciplinary academic journal, established in 1995, which focuses on the political, social, economic and cultural evolutions of contemporary China (PRC, Hong Kong, Macao, and Taiwan). It is endowed with an Editorial Board of internationally recognized experts in all areas of the social sciences; All submissions are blindly reviewed by two anonymous external referees; Indexed in the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Web of Science); Indexed in 8 international databases (including SCOPUS); Ranked by the French Council for the Evaluation of Research (HCERES) in Political Science, Sociology/demography and Anthropology.

Bibliography

BARANOVITCH Nimrod, China′s New Voices. Popular Music, Ethnicity, Gender, & Politics, 1978 – 1997, University of California Press, 2003.

BARME Geremie, Seeds of Fire: Chinese Voices of Conscience, Hill and Wang.

BECKER Howard, Art Worlds, University of California Press, 2008.

CHU Yiu-Wai, Hong Kong Cantopop: A Concise History, HKU Press, 2017.

CONDRY Ian, Hip-hop Japan. Rap and the paths of cultural globalization, Duke University Press, 2006.

DE KLOET Jeroen, China with a Cut. Globalisation, Urban Youth and Popular Music, Amsterdam University Press, 2010.

DE KLOET Jeroen, CHOW Yiu Fai, Sonic Multiplicities. Hong Kong Pop and the Global Circulation of Sound and Image, Intellect, 2013.

FUNG Anthony, “Consuming Karaoke in China. Modernities and Cultural Contradiction”, in Chinese Sociology and Anthropology, Vol. 42, no. 2, 2010, pp. 39-55.

HALL Stuart, JEFFERSON Tony (eds.), Resistance Through Rituals. Youth Subcultures in Post-War Britain, Routledge, 2006.

HARRIS Rachel, “Reggae on the Silk Road: The Globalization of Uyghur Pop” in The China Quarterly, No. 183, 2005-2, pp. 627- 643.

HEBDIGE Dick, Subcultures. The Meaning of Style, Routledge, 1979.

JONES, Andrew F. Like a Knife. Ideology and Genre In Contemporary Chinese Popular Music. Cornell East Asia Series, 1997.

LINK Perry and MADSEN Richard P. (eds.), Unofficial China: Popular Culture and Thoughts in the People’s Republic, Westview Press, 1990.

LINK Perry and MADSEN Richard P. (eds.), Popular China. Unofficial Culture in a Globalizing Society, Rowman & Littlefield, 2002.

SHIH Shu-mei, Visuality and Identity. Sinophone Articulations Across the Pacific, University of California Press, 2007.

SHIH Shu-mei (ed.), Sinophone Studies. A Critical Reader, Columbia University Press, 2013.

WONG Chuen-Fung, “Singing Muqam in Uyghur Pop: Minority Modernity and Popular Music in China” in Popular Music and Society, Vol. 36, n°1, 2013, pp. 98-118.

 

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Call for Proposals: IASPM-SEA Conference 2019

Call for Proposals: IASPM-SEA Conference 2019

‘Popular x Traditional’

11-13 January 2019, RUANG Think City, Kuala Lumpur

Deadline for abstracts: 31 August 2018

The IASPM-SEA Conference (IASPM-SEA 2019), hosted by RUANG Think City, will take place on Friday 11th to Sunday 13th January 2019 at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. This international conference will feature research and performances about the interaction, convergence and contestation of popular music with traditional music in Southeast Asia. We also welcome proposals of / from / on any region that relate to the conference theme or subthemes.

Aside from aesthetic approaches that merge local traditions with global popular music styles, the conference also seeks to question the notion of the popular in relation to the traditional. It is often overlooked that currently considered traditional musics were once popular art forms, either practiced communally (in sites of worship, villages, homes, ritual festivities) or consumed commercially (in records, films, cassettes, concert halls). However, postcolonial states in the region continually seek to construct and perpetuate a primordial expression of national identity, sourced in invented traditions that have resulted in homogenous boundaries of musical culture. In truth, the popular is in constant dialogue with the traditional, as musical practices and styles adapt and change in a process mediated by human actors in ever-changing historical, political, social and cultural contexts.

Thus, the theme of ‘Popular x Traditional’ invites participants to think beyond such the oppositional divide between the two terms in music practice and scholarship, drawing attention to the fluid interchanges and continual adaptations of music-making in the context of distinct national, ethnic and cultural identities expressed in an increasingly commodified and digitally-mediated world.

Keynote speakers

– To be announced

Conference Themes

– Popular x Traditional

– Local x Global

– Art x Commercial

– Performance x Production

– Analog x Digital

– Independent x Mainstream

– Religious x Secular

Proposal categories
– Papers (20 minutes maximum, with 10 minutes for discussion)
– Paper sessions (three or four papers, each of 20 minutes maximum, with 10 minutes per paper for discussion)
– Roundtable discussions (up to 6 participants, each giving a short position paper, followed by a general discussion, total running time of 90 or 120 minutes)
– Recitals, lecture-recitals and lectures illustrated by sound diffusions or audio-visual screenings (maximum duration 90 minutes)

Proposal guidelines
– For individual papers: up to 250 words
– For paper sessions: 250-word (maximum) summary and up to 200 words for each session participant
– For roundtable discussions: 250-word (maximum) and up to 150 words for each panel participant
– For recitals, lecture-recitals and lectures illustrated by sound diffusions or audio-visual screenings: 250 word (maximum) summary, plus participant CVs and recordings / scores / other details of works to be included in the event (contact the organizing committee to discuss)

Further information for applicants
– Proposals must be sent by email as a MS Word or PDF attachment to iaspm.sea@gmail.com.
– Proposals need not be anonymised.
– All enquiries should be sent to Ken-Ny via iaspm.sea@gmail.com.

Programme committee:

Adil Johan (UKM, Malaysia)

Citra Aryandari (ISI Yogyakarta, Indonesia)

Raja Iskandar Halid (UMK, Malaysia)

Liew Kai Khiun (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)

Viriya Sawangchot (Inter-Asia School, Thailand)

Sarah Hill (Cardiff University, UK)

Proposal submission deadline:

31 August 2018.

Applicants will be notified by 30 September 2018.

The 6th IAPMS Conference in Beijing, China, 2018

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*** Jun 2, 2018: Program Booklet (ver 1.4) 

*** May 24, 2018: Panel Schedule announced

*** May 24, 2018: Location and Transportation

*** Dec 5, 2018: The deadline for the submission is extended to December 29.

 

The 6th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference 2018 in Beijing, China

Date:

June 9-10, 2018

 

Venue:

Communication University of China

No.1 Ding Fuzhuang East Street, Chaoyang District, Beijing, China 100024

www.cuc.edu.cn

 

Organized by:

Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Group (IAPMS Group)

Music and Recording Art College, Faculty of Art, Communication University of China

 

Keynote speaker:

Keith Negus (Goldsmiths, University of London, UK)

 

Theme:

Asia in the Mix: Places, Temporalities and Inter-Asian Entanglements of Popular Music

 

Statement:

Ranging from J-pop to Indonesian punk, from Chinese folk to Japanese Enka, from Bollywood songs to Thai heavy metal, music takes multiple forms and identities, allowing for complex negotiations of both time and place. These forms quickly travel, mostly regionally, and in some rare cases also globally. The circulation of sounds changes over time, for example, where in the 1990s Cantopop played an important role regionally, this role has now been taken over by both Mandapop and K-Pop. The sound of Bollywood, on the other hand, continues to fascinate the global imagination. Further down in South-east Asia, Indonesian and Malaysian boy bands merge their Islamic beliefs with the global sound of pop.

Amidst this cacophony of voices, sounds and images, we wonder: what are the sounds of that construct called “Asia”? How do sounds travel regionally, and globally, and why? How comes that certain sounds travel better than others? How does the music industry respond to the changes caused by globalization and digitization? What transnational fancultures do emerge? The entanglements we witness refer not only to place but also to time, for example, folk music often expresses an urban alienation and romanticizes a forgotten past, while other sounds from the past are brought back to life, or reassembled in a quite different form, or come from a different place. The nostalgia of Japanese Enka speaks to the longings of urban youth in Taiwan. And take for example the Chinese band RETROS and their reinterpretation of the 80s sound of Bauhaus from the UK, or a reinterpretation of the Shanghai sound of Zhou Xuan from the 1930s and 1940s in electronic music. At the same time, in India, old Bollywood classics are reworked into club house dance songs. These various music cultures and their social significance cannot be possible without the workings of the music industry, whether on a local, regional or international scale.

 

This conference aims to bring scholars together that work on the different popular musics of Asia, linking these to negotiations of both place and time, and paying special attention to the entanglements of sound with these two categories.

 

Schedule:

Please submit an abstract (200-300 words) and short bio (max. 100 words) by 15 29 December 2017 to iapmsconference@gmail.com. For panels, please submit a general panel description of 200-300 words, four abstracts (200-300 words each) and biographies (max. 100 words each). Please use the Proposal Form (right click to download) when submitting your proposal, and use your surname as file name (ex. Chua.doc, Douglas.doc).

 

Notice of acceptance will be given by 1 February 2018

 

Registration fee

 

Waged members: 75 USD

Unwaged/ Students: 50 USD

 

Language:

English

 

Journal Support:

Global Media and China

 

Local committee:

Zhang Qian (Communication University of China)

Zhao Zhi’an (Communication University of China)

 

Organizing committee:

Yiu Fai Chow (Hong Kong Baptist University, China)

Anthony Fung (Chinese University, Hong Kong/ China)

Kaori Fushiki (Taisho University, Japan)

Jeroen Groenewegen (Independent scholar, China/ the Netherlands)

Tung Hung Ho (Fu-jen Catholic University, Taiwan)

Jeroen de Kloet (University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands/ Beijing Film Academy, China)

Liu Fei (Chinese National Academy of Arts, China)

Yoshitaka Mori (Tokyo University of the Arts, Japan)

Hyunjoon Shin (Sungkonghoe University, Korea)

Jung-yup Lee (University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA)

Wang Qian (Yibin University, China)

Zhang Qian (Communication University of China, China)

Call for Papers – Crossroads in Cultural Studies, 2018

Crossroads in Cultural Studies, 2018

For the first time in its history, Crossroads in Cultural Studiesis coming to Mainland China. Hosted by Shanghai University, the 12th Crossroads in Cultural Studies will be held in Shanghai, from August 12th to 15th 2018 , prior to the date there will be a one day pre-conference for graduate students on August 11th. Scholars from around the world will come together in the beautiful summertime to engage with the past, present and future of cultural studies scholarship.

Keynote Speakers: Stay tuned for the announcement of more speakers!

The Crossroads in Cultural Studies Conference has played an important role in the creation of a global discussion of Cultural Studies. It has become a major international conference where scholars from all five continents gather regularly to exchange research, views, and insights. Organized by the Association for Cultural Studies (ACS), the Crossroads conference is held every other year in different parts of the world. Previous conferences have taken place in Sydney(Australia), Birmingham (United Kingdom), Urbana-Champaign (USA), Istanbul (Turkey), Kingston (Jamaica), Hong Kong (China), Paris (France), and Tampere (Finland).

A day-long postgraduate/graduate research student conference will precede the main conference on August 11th.

  • Submit your proposal before 24:00, Nov. 30th, 2017(Beijing time). The call for both pre-organized panel and paper proposals (for both main conference and pre-conference) is now open.Submission guidelines and forms can be accessed here.
  • Information on registration and accommodation will follow soon, along with confirmed speakers.
  • Spread the news! Please share this page with your colleagues and friends – we look forward to seeing you in Shanghai in the summer of 2018!
Suggested Topics for Crossroads 2018 Shanghai:

The conference is open to all topics relevant to cultural studies. Here are some suggested topics as food for thought, drawing on the work of our invited keynote, plenary and spotlight speakers, and on more general themes in cultural studies research. However, all contemporary cultural studies research is welcome at this conference:

  • Relationships between the urban and the rural
  • Political/cultural unconscious of the youth
  • Ideas and practices for the alternative
  • Knowledge production and its transformation
  • Rethinking university and the academic community
  • Return to the communities
  • Human/non-human relations
  • Working class and the intellectual proletariat
  • Green culture/economy
  • Gender identity
  • Creative industry and cultural economy
  • Labour right and robot
  • Political and technical dimensions of “post-truth”
  • Practices of space
  • Food sovereignty, safety and quality
  • Redefinition of economy
  • Cultural citizenship
  • New media and new politics
  • Law and everyday-life rationality
  • Immaterial labour and intellectual property
  • Rethinking time in the digital era
  • Regional cultural traditions and global mainstream culture
  • Borders and mobilities

CFP: The 5th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference 2016 in Melbourne (Australia)

* Note: The deadline is extended to May 25.

CFP: The 5th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference 2016 in Melbourne (Australia)

Date: 11-12 December 2016, (Sunday-Monday)

Venue: Monash Asia Institute (MAI), Monash University, Caulfield Campus

900 Dandenong Road, Caulfield East, Victoria 3145, Australia (Melway Ref: 68 F1)

* For information on travelling to Caulfield campus (how to get to, parking and map), please visit Monash University Caulfield campus and Google Maps.  Getting There will be helpful to travel Melbourne.

 

Organized by:

Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Group (IAPMS group),

Monash Asia Institute & School of Media, Film and Journalism, , Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

KEY NOTE SPEAKER: Andy Bennett (Griffith University)

Music (Post)subcultures and Scenes in Asia: Towards a Rethinking of Concepts and Theories

PLENARY SESSION: Koichi Iwabuchi (Manash University), Shane Homan (Monash University) et al.

Australia in Inter-Asian Pop Music Flows/connections

 

STATEMENT

We are pleased to announce the 5th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference, which will take place on December 10-11, 2016 in Melbourne, in collaboration with Monash Asia Institute and School of Media, Film and Journalism, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. Following the first conference in Osaka in 2008, the second conference in Hong Kong in 2010, the third conference in Taipei in 2012, and the fourth conference in Chiang Mai, we move our next meeting to Australia, a country which geographically belongs to ‘Asia’ and has a large population of Asian backgrounds and many people working with musicians and producers in other parts of Asia.

Founded in 2008, Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Group (IAPMS group) is a research network that at the moment includes 120 scholars not only in Asia but also in Europe, America and Oceania. Through its biennial conferences and related activities, the group provides a platform to foster scholarly conversations and collaborations arising from the growing academic interest in Asian popular music both inside and outside Asia.

CONFERENCE THEME (IAPMS∙2016∙Melbourne):

Reframing Asian Popular Music in Time-Place

In retrospect, Shuhei Hosokawa’s 1998 prediction in his book Karaoke Around the World sounds rather premature when he claimed, “There exists no ‘Asian’ pop but various forms of pop music in Asia.” Despite what seemed at the time the unbridgeable cultural, linguistic, religious and ethnic differences, decades of intensified trans-Asia cultural traffic has generated some seminal forms of ‘Asian’ pop music that entertain people across the national borders. Furthermore, there emerges a new batch of pop music that bears the influence of these new forms throughout East and Southeast Asia. Through the practices of relentless emulation, adaptation and referencing, some stylitically coherent, regionally based pop music is being created. So we have J-pop (Japanese pop), K-pop (Korean pop), M-pop (Mandarin pop), V-pop (Vietnamese pop), T-pop (Thai pop), I-pop (Indo pop), L-pop (Lao pop) and so on which, despite different prefixes, do not sound and look very far apart from each other.

The emergence of pan-Asian pop in country-coded names is the latest development unfolding in front of our eyes. However, we still do not have a large stock of shared knowledge about pop music of Asia beyond the glossy surface of the hiphenated pop, In particular, we barely know other Asian countries’s or regions’s histories, cultures and traditions of pop music. This lack of shared knowledge is becoming one of the main obstacles to re-imagining and and constructing Asian pop as a concrete entity. Thus, any constructive inquiry into Asian pop needs to delve deep into each country/region’s rich legacy of popular music and render visible what is increasingly being erased, forgotten and buried.

For this purpose, we propose a rethinking of Asian pop through a frame of time-place. Asian people are not familiar with the idea of Asian pop as a common currency as popular music of the continent has been narrativized firmly along the lines of the national and/or the ethnic. By bringing the subnational to the fore, we would like to introduce a new way of thinking/talking about Asian pop and take a step forward from rather abstract and often unproductive categories of the national and the ethnㅑc. Eschewing the existing way of addressing Asian pop in terms of nationality and/or ethnicity, we propose a research agendum of “Asian pop in particular time and place”. Here, Asian pop will appear in the form of, say, ‘1920s Osaka’, ‘1940s Shanghai’, ‘1950s Bangkok’, ‘1970s Manila’, ‘1980s Beijing’, ‘1990s Tainan’, ‘2000s Bandung’ rather than the tired classification of K-pop, J-pop, Canto-pop and so on.

Furthermore, the 2016 conference will be a great occasion to reconsider the inclusiveness of “Asian” and “Inter-Asia” by examining how Australia has been already and always part of Asian pop music flows and connections. Geographically located in the fringe of “Asia” and being a British settler colony, Australia tends to be not included in the study of Asian pop music. However Australia actually belongs to cultural geography of “Asia” for many people of Asian backgrounds live in Australia as long-standing diaspora, second & third-generation Asian Australians, recent migrants, temporary workers and overseas students who enjoy pop music of diverse parts of Asia. Furthermore, musicians, producers and industries has been collaborating with other Asian counterparts. We would welcome any paper proposal that explores the way in which Australia is part of inter-Asian pop music flows and connection. We believe that the examination of a time-space frame in terms of Australia’s involvedness in popular cultural geography of “Asia” will fruitfully expand our perspectives in the study of Asian pop music.

There have been precious precursors of Asian pop and its ilk loved and fondly remembered in a multitude of Asian countries. It could be a good starting point to explore production, circulation, consumption and impacts of these stars and hit songs in construction of Asian pop. Of course, it is far from our intention to force a contrived association between a particular sound and time-place or encourage what sounds suspiciously like a journalistic practice. We would just like to see if this change in perspective would yield any productive outcome and evaluate its potential.

Having said that, any paper that examines popular music’s contribution to construction of life (and death) of people in a particular time-place will be welcomed and much appreciated. The organizer of Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference 2016 in Melbourne would like to invite paper presenters to send their abstract (not more than 250 words) to iapmsconference@gmail.com before 15 May 2016.

Please use the Proposal Form (right click to download) when submitting your proposal. Please use your surname as file name (ex. Chua.doc, Douglas.doc). If you plan to organize a panel with more than two people, please coordinate with the panelists to put all the necessary information on one form (e.g., panel title, paper titles, individual abstracts, panelist information). A panel description is not necessary.

Please email all inquiries to: iapmsconference@gmail.com.

 

PUBLICATIONS AFTER CONFERENCE

In general, the paper submitted to the conference will be considered for publication in a special issue of a journal that organizing committee is working on. For papers that are intended for consideration for publications, we require these papers to be in one of the following streams:

1: Theory and Methodology

2: Production, Circulation and Consumption

3: Politics

4: Identity, Ideology, Affect

Besides, full paper submission is required for consideration for publication. Full and completed paper can be sent to the conference email on or before the conference dates. However, all papers will be sent for blind review, and there is no guarantee that the papers will be accepted.

 

SCHEDULE

2016.5.25 Deadline for abstract submission

2016.7.15 Acceptance of papers

2016.9.15 Registration

2016.11.15 Submission of papers

2016.12.11-12 Conference Days

REGISTRATION FEE

Committee members: AUD$ 80

Waged members: AUD$ 60

Unwaged members: AUD$ 30

Local Committee

Koichi Iwabuchi (Monash University, Australia/Japan)

Shane Homan (Monash University, Australia)…

Organizing Committee

Anthony FUNG (Chinese University, Hong Kong/China)

Jeroen Groenwegen-Lau (Independent scholar, China/Netherlands)

Tunghung HO (Fu-jen Catholic University, Taiwan)

Koichi Iwabuchi (Monash University, Australia/Japan)

Kai Khiun LIEW (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)

Jung-yup LEE (University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA/Korea)

Keewoong LEE (Sungkonghoe University, Korea)

Yoshitaka MORI (Tokyo University of the Arts, Japan)

Viriya Sawangchot (Independent scholar/ThaiPBS, Thailand)

Hyunjoon SHIN (Sungkonghoe University, Korea)

Eva TSAI (National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan)

Buni Yani (LSPR School of Communication, Phillipines/Indonesia)

ZHANG Qian (Communication University of China, China)

Notes:

English is the only language in the conference as there is no common language among Asia language. Translation service can be provided only during Q&A, in case the presenters need it.

This conference is consciously scheduled before the ACS Crossroads 2016 Conference in Sydney (14-17 December). For more information on that conference please go to: http://crossroads2016.org/call-for-papers/ and https://www.facebook.com/XR2016/.

For the updated information about submission, registration, accommodation, transportation etc, please keep visiting our website: http:www.interasiapop.org.

 

[CFP] 18th Biennial IASPM Conference

Call for papers
Back to the Future: Popular Music and Time
18th Biennial IASPM Conference
29 June – 3 July 2015
Universidade Estadual de Campinas
São Paulo, Brazil

*Versão em português abaixo*
*Versión en español abajo*

Whether in relation to rhythms, eras, live performances, lyrics, identities, politics, scenes, production, or changing technologies, the topic of time can be linked to popular music in a variety of ways. The compartmentalising of sounds into genres, the ageing of audiences, and the shifting sands of the music industry all invoke notions of the temporal. For the 18th Biennial IASPM Conference, we invite researchers and practitioners to submit proposals for presentations that engage with the theme of time. We encourage proposals dealing with one of the following strands:

– Ageing Times: fandom and memory; musicians’ biographies; archiving and remastering; ageing bodies; ageing technologies; recycling repertoires.
– Historical and Social Times: contextual times; local and global histories and counter-histories; fashion, retro and revival trends; timelessness; sampling and other forms of sonic genealogies, re-circulations and surrogations.
– Modern Times: new sounds; new technologies; futurism; music industry strategies; mobile media.
– Phenomenological Times: creative process; performance deployment; gesture, affect and listening experience; cross time productions, collaborations and performances.
– Structural Times: rhythm, tempo, groove, swing, beat and the various ways of conceptualizing the duration of sound; periodicity and repetition; flow and cadence; being in/out of time and sync; relationships between noise and silence(s).

There will be the options of: panels (of 3 or 4 presenters), individual papers, film/video presentations, or poster sessions.

Panels
Proposals of organized panels are strongly recommended (two-hour long sessions with four papers, or three papers and a discussant). Each session should leave at least 30 minutes for discussion or for comments by a discussant immediately following the presentations. The panel organizer should submit the panel abstract and all individual abstracts (200 words each) in one document, with a full list of participant names and email addresses. Where an independently submitted abstract appears to fit a panel, the Academic Committee may suggest the addition of a panelist.

Papers
We invite abstracts of no longer than 200 words, including five keywords for programming purposes. Individual paper presentations are 20 minutes long to be followed by 10 minutes of discussion.

Film/video session
Recently completed films introduced by their author and discussed by conference participants may be proposed. Submit a 200-word abstract including titles, subjects, and formats, and indicate the duration of the proposed films/videos and introduction/discussion.

Poster session
A space where presenters can exhibit posters, that remain on hand for a scheduled period for discussion, will be provided. A 200-word abstract by the poster’s author, including five keywords for programming purposes, must be submitted.

Submission
Please email your abstract as a Word doc attachment to iaspm15[at]iaspm.net. Please name the file with your surname. The following format should be used:

– Name, affiliation and contact email address
– Type of presentation (select one from: panel, individual paper, film/video, poster)
– Title of presentation (and panel if applicable)
– Strand (select one from: Ageing Times / Historical and Social Times / Modern Times / Phenomenological Times / Structural Times)
– Abstract
– Five keywords
– Bio (80 words maximum)

Papers will be accepted in English, IASPM’s official language, and Portuguese and Spanish, IASPM Latin America’s official languages. For submissions in Portuguese and Spanish, an additional abstract in English is required, and, if selected, an English visual presentation is to be screened while presenting.

Questions about the organization of panels should be directed to the Chair of the Academic Committee, Goffredo Plastino: chair[at]iaspm.net. Suggestions for other possible events at the Conference should be directed to the Chair of the local Organizing Committee, Rafael dos Santos: rdsantos[at]unicamp.br

Each participant must be a member of IASPM:http://www.iaspm.net/how-to-join. Each participant may present only one paper at the Conference, but may also preside over a panel or serve as a discussant.

Deadlines
Deadline for receiving abstracts: 31 May 2014
Acceptance/rejection letters: 30 September 2014
Opening registration: 1 October 2014
Deadline for “early bird” registration (US$ 150): 1 February 2015
Program draft: 1 March 2015
Conference fee payment deadline (US$ 200): 2 April 2015
Final program: 31 May 2015

CFP: The 4th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference 2014 in Chiang Mai (Thailand)

CFP: The 4th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference2014 in Chiang Mai (Thailand)

Date: 8-9 August 2014, (Friday-Saturday)

Venue: College of Arts, Media and Technology, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand

Campus Map: http://www.camt.cmu.ac.th/en/contact.php

Organized by:

Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Group (IAPMS group),

College of Arts, Media and Technology, Chiang Mai, Thailand

Statement

We are pleased to announce the 4th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference, which will take place on August 8-9, 2014 in Chiang Mai, in collaboration with College of Arts, Media and Technology, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. Following the first conference in Osaka in 2008, the second conference in Hong Kong in 2010, and the third conference in Taipei in 2012, we move our next meeting to Thailand—hub of vibrant Southeast Asian popular music and music industry.

Founded in 2008, Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Group (IAPMS group) is a research network that at the moment includes 120 scholars not only in Asia but also in Europe, America and Oceania. Through its biennial conferences and related activities, the group provides a platform to foster scholarly conversations and collaborations arising from the growing academic interest in Asian popular music both inside and outside Asia.

CONFERENCE THEME (IAPMS∙2014∙Chiang Mai):

How to PerformInter-AsiaPopular MusicStudies

Nowadays, Asian popular music is strong and  serious investigation on it is growing, in the academy and elsewhere. More importantly, the cultural economy of popular music in Asia has become transnational or border-crossing in a literal sense. There are  quite a few case studies that show that the consumption and mediation as well as the production and distribution easily cross national borders.

However, most of ‘inter-Asia’ popular music studies restrict themselves to  a ‘national’ base. Most researchers are specialized in the popular music of one nation or language group and it has proven to be quite a challenge to adopt a truly ‘inter-Asia’ perspective. This perspective of comparative or cross-cultural research is unfortunately still  a somewhat distant ideal, with only a handful successful texts that light the way. Given this situation, is it enough for each researcher to write about his/her ‘own’ music and leave the comparison to the readers of a ‘special issue’ or ‘edited volume’ that covers different ‘cases’? Or should we rather find out a‘collective’ or ‘collaborative’ approach to doing research and writing papers? How can it be done, when you do not have sufficient international connections, when there is no agreed upon vocabulary and periodization, when your time schedule or life cycle does not match? Finally, is collective or collaborative writing really necessary?

The 4th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies conference will address the possibilities and difficulties of adopting an ‘inter-Asia’ perspective. We especially welcome papers that consider comparative and/or collaborative research, in the future as well as in the present. The conference engages with all the scholarly debates of the emerging fields of Inter-Asia popular music studies, in the following categories or streams:

Stream 1: Theory and Methodology
Stream 2: Production, Circulation and Consumption
Stream 3: History,Geography, Politics
Stream 4: Genre, Identity, Ideology

The organizer of Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference 2014 in Chiang Mai would like to invite paper presenters to send their abstract (not more than 250 words) to iapms2014chiangmai@gmail.com before 25 January 2014. Please don’t forget to write down the ‘stream’ in which you think your paper fits.

Please use the attached Proposal Form (right click to download) when submitting your proposal. Please use your surname as file name (ex. Chua.doc, Douglas.doc). If you plan to organize a panel with more than two people, please coordinate with the panelists to put all the necessary information on one form (e.g., panel title, paper titles, individual abstracts, panelists information). A panel description is not necessary.

Please email all inquiries to: iapms2014chiangmai@gmail.com

2014.1.25 Deadline for abstract submission

2014.02.25 Acceptance of papers

2014.04.25 Registration

2014.07.25 Submission of full paper

2014.08.08-09 Conference Days

Steering Committees

Viriya Sawangchot (API Fellow & Mahidol University, Thailand)

Siriporn Somboonbooran (Walailak University, Thailand)

Atchareeya Saisin (Chiang Mai University, Thailand)

Pitipong Yodmongkol (CAMT, Chiang Mai University)

Napaporn Reeveerakul (CAMT, Chiang Mai University)

Sumet Yodkaew (CAMT, Chiang Mai University)

Organizing Committees

Tunghung HO (Fu-jen Catholic University, Taiwan)

Eva TSAI (National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan)

Anthony FUNG (Chinese University, Hong Kong/China)

Yoshitaka MORI (Tokyo University of the Arts, Japan)

Jeroen Groenwegen-Lau (Independent scholar, Netherlands-China)

Yukie HIRATA (Dokkyo University, Japan)

Sun JUNG (National University of Singapore, Singapore)

Kai Khiun LIEW (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)

Aekyung PARK (Yonsei University, Korea)

Hyunjoon SHIN (Sungkonghoe University, Korea)

Jung-yup LEE (University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA/Korea)

Notes

English is the only language in the conference as there is no common language among Asia language. Translation service can be provided only during Q&A, in case  the presenters need it.

For the updated information about submission, registration, accommodation, transportation etc, please keep visiting our website: http:www.interasiapop.org.