CFP: The 5th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference 2016 in Melbourne (Australia)

* Note: The deadline is extended to May 25.

CFP: The 5th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference 2016 in Melbourne (Australia)

Date: 11-12 December 2016, (Sunday-Monday)

Venue: Monash Asia Institute (MAI), Monash University, Caulfield Campus

900 Dandenong Road, Caulfield East, Victoria 3145, Australia (Melway Ref: 68 F1)

* For information on travelling to Caulfield campus (how to get to, parking and map), please visit Monash University Caulfield campus and Google Maps.  Getting There will be helpful to travel Melbourne.

 

Organized by:

Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Group (IAPMS group),

Monash Asia Institute & School of Media, Film and Journalism, , Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

KEY NOTE SPEAKER: Andy Bennett (Griffith University)

Music (Post)subcultures and Scenes in Asia: Towards a Rethinking of Concepts and Theories

PLENARY SESSION: Koichi Iwabuchi (Manash University), Shane Homan (Monash University) et al.

Australia in Inter-Asian Pop Music Flows/connections

 

STATEMENT

We are pleased to announce the 5th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference, which will take place on December 10-11, 2016 in Melbourne, in collaboration with Monash Asia Institute and School of Media, Film and Journalism, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. Following the first conference in Osaka in 2008, the second conference in Hong Kong in 2010, the third conference in Taipei in 2012, and the fourth conference in Chiang Mai, we move our next meeting to Australia, a country which geographically belongs to ‘Asia’ and has a large population of Asian backgrounds and many people working with musicians and producers in other parts of Asia.

Founded in 2008, Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Group (IAPMS group) is a research network that at the moment includes 120 scholars not only in Asia but also in Europe, America and Oceania. Through its biennial conferences and related activities, the group provides a platform to foster scholarly conversations and collaborations arising from the growing academic interest in Asian popular music both inside and outside Asia.

CONFERENCE THEME (IAPMS∙2016∙Melbourne):

Reframing Asian Popular Music in Time-Place

In retrospect, Shuhei Hosokawa’s 1998 prediction in his book Karaoke Around the World sounds rather premature when he claimed, “There exists no ‘Asian’ pop but various forms of pop music in Asia.” Despite what seemed at the time the unbridgeable cultural, linguistic, religious and ethnic differences, decades of intensified trans-Asia cultural traffic has generated some seminal forms of ‘Asian’ pop music that entertain people across the national borders. Furthermore, there emerges a new batch of pop music that bears the influence of these new forms throughout East and Southeast Asia. Through the practices of relentless emulation, adaptation and referencing, some stylitically coherent, regionally based pop music is being created. So we have J-pop (Japanese pop), K-pop (Korean pop), M-pop (Mandarin pop), V-pop (Vietnamese pop), T-pop (Thai pop), I-pop (Indo pop), L-pop (Lao pop) and so on which, despite different prefixes, do not sound and look very far apart from each other.

The emergence of pan-Asian pop in country-coded names is the latest development unfolding in front of our eyes. However, we still do not have a large stock of shared knowledge about pop music of Asia beyond the glossy surface of the hiphenated pop, In particular, we barely know other Asian countries’s or regions’s histories, cultures and traditions of pop music. This lack of shared knowledge is becoming one of the main obstacles to re-imagining and and constructing Asian pop as a concrete entity. Thus, any constructive inquiry into Asian pop needs to delve deep into each country/region’s rich legacy of popular music and render visible what is increasingly being erased, forgotten and buried.

For this purpose, we propose a rethinking of Asian pop through a frame of time-place. Asian people are not familiar with the idea of Asian pop as a common currency as popular music of the continent has been narrativized firmly along the lines of the national and/or the ethnic. By bringing the subnational to the fore, we would like to introduce a new way of thinking/talking about Asian pop and take a step forward from rather abstract and often unproductive categories of the national and the ethnㅑc. Eschewing the existing way of addressing Asian pop in terms of nationality and/or ethnicity, we propose a research agendum of “Asian pop in particular time and place”. Here, Asian pop will appear in the form of, say, ‘1920s Osaka’, ‘1940s Shanghai’, ‘1950s Bangkok’, ‘1970s Manila’, ‘1980s Beijing’, ‘1990s Tainan’, ‘2000s Bandung’ rather than the tired classification of K-pop, J-pop, Canto-pop and so on.

Furthermore, the 2016 conference will be a great occasion to reconsider the inclusiveness of “Asian” and “Inter-Asia” by examining how Australia has been already and always part of Asian pop music flows and connections. Geographically located in the fringe of “Asia” and being a British settler colony, Australia tends to be not included in the study of Asian pop music. However Australia actually belongs to cultural geography of “Asia” for many people of Asian backgrounds live in Australia as long-standing diaspora, second & third-generation Asian Australians, recent migrants, temporary workers and overseas students who enjoy pop music of diverse parts of Asia. Furthermore, musicians, producers and industries has been collaborating with other Asian counterparts. We would welcome any paper proposal that explores the way in which Australia is part of inter-Asian pop music flows and connection. We believe that the examination of a time-space frame in terms of Australia’s involvedness in popular cultural geography of “Asia” will fruitfully expand our perspectives in the study of Asian pop music.

There have been precious precursors of Asian pop and its ilk loved and fondly remembered in a multitude of Asian countries. It could be a good starting point to explore production, circulation, consumption and impacts of these stars and hit songs in construction of Asian pop. Of course, it is far from our intention to force a contrived association between a particular sound and time-place or encourage what sounds suspiciously like a journalistic practice. We would just like to see if this change in perspective would yield any productive outcome and evaluate its potential.

Having said that, any paper that examines popular music’s contribution to construction of life (and death) of people in a particular time-place will be welcomed and much appreciated. The organizer of Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference 2016 in Melbourne would like to invite paper presenters to send their abstract (not more than 250 words) to iapmsconference@gmail.com before 15 May 2016.

Please use the Proposal Form (right click to download) when submitting your proposal. Please use your surname as file name (ex. Chua.doc, Douglas.doc). If you plan to organize a panel with more than two people, please coordinate with the panelists to put all the necessary information on one form (e.g., panel title, paper titles, individual abstracts, panelist information). A panel description is not necessary.

Please email all inquiries to: iapmsconference@gmail.com.

 

PUBLICATIONS AFTER CONFERENCE

In general, the paper submitted to the conference will be considered for publication in a special issue of a journal that organizing committee is working on. For papers that are intended for consideration for publications, we require these papers to be in one of the following streams:

1: Theory and Methodology

2: Production, Circulation and Consumption

3: Politics

4: Identity, Ideology, Affect

Besides, full paper submission is required for consideration for publication. Full and completed paper can be sent to the conference email on or before the conference dates. However, all papers will be sent for blind review, and there is no guarantee that the papers will be accepted.

 

SCHEDULE

2016.5.25 Deadline for abstract submission

2016.7.15 Acceptance of papers

2016.9.15 Registration

2016.11.15 Submission of papers

2016.12.11-12 Conference Days

REGISTRATION FEE

Committee members: AUD$ 80

Waged members: AUD$ 60

Unwaged members: AUD$ 30

Local Committee

Koichi Iwabuchi (Monash University, Australia/Japan)

Shane Homan (Monash University, Australia)…

Organizing Committee

Anthony FUNG (Chinese University, Hong Kong/China)

Jeroen Groenwegen-Lau (Independent scholar, China/Netherlands)

Tunghung HO (Fu-jen Catholic University, Taiwan)

Koichi Iwabuchi (Monash University, Australia/Japan)

Kai Khiun LIEW (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)

Jung-yup LEE (University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA/Korea)

Keewoong LEE (Sungkonghoe University, Korea)

Yoshitaka MORI (Tokyo University of the Arts, Japan)

Viriya Sawangchot (Independent scholar/ThaiPBS, Thailand)

Hyunjoon SHIN (Sungkonghoe University, Korea)

Eva TSAI (National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan)

Buni Yani (LSPR School of Communication, Phillipines/Indonesia)

ZHANG Qian (Communication University of China, China)

Notes:

English is the only language in the conference as there is no common language among Asia language. Translation service can be provided only during Q&A, in case the presenters need it.

This conference is consciously scheduled before the ACS Crossroads 2016 Conference in Sydney (14-17 December). For more information on that conference please go to: http://crossroads2016.org/call-for-papers/ and https://www.facebook.com/XR2016/.

For the updated information about submission, registration, accommodation, transportation etc, please keep visiting our website: http:www.interasiapop.org.

 

[CFP] 18th Biennial IASPM Conference

Call for papers
Back to the Future: Popular Music and Time
18th Biennial IASPM Conference
29 June – 3 July 2015
Universidade Estadual de Campinas
São Paulo, Brazil

*Versão em português abaixo*
*Versión en español abajo*

Whether in relation to rhythms, eras, live performances, lyrics, identities, politics, scenes, production, or changing technologies, the topic of time can be linked to popular music in a variety of ways. The compartmentalising of sounds into genres, the ageing of audiences, and the shifting sands of the music industry all invoke notions of the temporal. For the 18th Biennial IASPM Conference, we invite researchers and practitioners to submit proposals for presentations that engage with the theme of time. We encourage proposals dealing with one of the following strands:

– Ageing Times: fandom and memory; musicians’ biographies; archiving and remastering; ageing bodies; ageing technologies; recycling repertoires.
– Historical and Social Times: contextual times; local and global histories and counter-histories; fashion, retro and revival trends; timelessness; sampling and other forms of sonic genealogies, re-circulations and surrogations.
– Modern Times: new sounds; new technologies; futurism; music industry strategies; mobile media.
– Phenomenological Times: creative process; performance deployment; gesture, affect and listening experience; cross time productions, collaborations and performances.
– Structural Times: rhythm, tempo, groove, swing, beat and the various ways of conceptualizing the duration of sound; periodicity and repetition; flow and cadence; being in/out of time and sync; relationships between noise and silence(s).

There will be the options of: panels (of 3 or 4 presenters), individual papers, film/video presentations, or poster sessions.

Panels
Proposals of organized panels are strongly recommended (two-hour long sessions with four papers, or three papers and a discussant). Each session should leave at least 30 minutes for discussion or for comments by a discussant immediately following the presentations. The panel organizer should submit the panel abstract and all individual abstracts (200 words each) in one document, with a full list of participant names and email addresses. Where an independently submitted abstract appears to fit a panel, the Academic Committee may suggest the addition of a panelist.

Papers
We invite abstracts of no longer than 200 words, including five keywords for programming purposes. Individual paper presentations are 20 minutes long to be followed by 10 minutes of discussion.

Film/video session
Recently completed films introduced by their author and discussed by conference participants may be proposed. Submit a 200-word abstract including titles, subjects, and formats, and indicate the duration of the proposed films/videos and introduction/discussion.

Poster session
A space where presenters can exhibit posters, that remain on hand for a scheduled period for discussion, will be provided. A 200-word abstract by the poster’s author, including five keywords for programming purposes, must be submitted.

Submission
Please email your abstract as a Word doc attachment to iaspm15[at]iaspm.net. Please name the file with your surname. The following format should be used:

– Name, affiliation and contact email address
– Type of presentation (select one from: panel, individual paper, film/video, poster)
– Title of presentation (and panel if applicable)
– Strand (select one from: Ageing Times / Historical and Social Times / Modern Times / Phenomenological Times / Structural Times)
– Abstract
– Five keywords
– Bio (80 words maximum)

Papers will be accepted in English, IASPM’s official language, and Portuguese and Spanish, IASPM Latin America’s official languages. For submissions in Portuguese and Spanish, an additional abstract in English is required, and, if selected, an English visual presentation is to be screened while presenting.

Questions about the organization of panels should be directed to the Chair of the Academic Committee, Goffredo Plastino: chair[at]iaspm.net. Suggestions for other possible events at the Conference should be directed to the Chair of the local Organizing Committee, Rafael dos Santos: rdsantos[at]unicamp.br

Each participant must be a member of IASPM:http://www.iaspm.net/how-to-join. Each participant may present only one paper at the Conference, but may also preside over a panel or serve as a discussant.

Deadlines
Deadline for receiving abstracts: 31 May 2014
Acceptance/rejection letters: 30 September 2014
Opening registration: 1 October 2014
Deadline for “early bird” registration (US$ 150): 1 February 2015
Program draft: 1 March 2015
Conference fee payment deadline (US$ 200): 2 April 2015
Final program: 31 May 2015

CFP: The 4th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference 2014 in Chiang Mai (Thailand)

CFP: The 4th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference2014 in Chiang Mai (Thailand)

Date: 8-9 August 2014, (Friday-Saturday)

Venue: College of Arts, Media and Technology, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand

Campus Map: http://www.camt.cmu.ac.th/en/contact.php

Organized by:

Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Group (IAPMS group),

College of Arts, Media and Technology, Chiang Mai, Thailand

Statement

We are pleased to announce the 4th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference, which will take place on August 8-9, 2014 in Chiang Mai, in collaboration with College of Arts, Media and Technology, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. Following the first conference in Osaka in 2008, the second conference in Hong Kong in 2010, and the third conference in Taipei in 2012, we move our next meeting to Thailand—hub of vibrant Southeast Asian popular music and music industry.

Founded in 2008, Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Group (IAPMS group) is a research network that at the moment includes 120 scholars not only in Asia but also in Europe, America and Oceania. Through its biennial conferences and related activities, the group provides a platform to foster scholarly conversations and collaborations arising from the growing academic interest in Asian popular music both inside and outside Asia.

CONFERENCE THEME (IAPMS∙2014∙Chiang Mai):

How to PerformInter-AsiaPopular MusicStudies

Nowadays, Asian popular music is strong and  serious investigation on it is growing, in the academy and elsewhere. More importantly, the cultural economy of popular music in Asia has become transnational or border-crossing in a literal sense. There are  quite a few case studies that show that the consumption and mediation as well as the production and distribution easily cross national borders.

However, most of ‘inter-Asia’ popular music studies restrict themselves to  a ‘national’ base. Most researchers are specialized in the popular music of one nation or language group and it has proven to be quite a challenge to adopt a truly ‘inter-Asia’ perspective. This perspective of comparative or cross-cultural research is unfortunately still  a somewhat distant ideal, with only a handful successful texts that light the way. Given this situation, is it enough for each researcher to write about his/her ‘own’ music and leave the comparison to the readers of a ‘special issue’ or ‘edited volume’ that covers different ‘cases’? Or should we rather find out a‘collective’ or ‘collaborative’ approach to doing research and writing papers? How can it be done, when you do not have sufficient international connections, when there is no agreed upon vocabulary and periodization, when your time schedule or life cycle does not match? Finally, is collective or collaborative writing really necessary?

The 4th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies conference will address the possibilities and difficulties of adopting an ‘inter-Asia’ perspective. We especially welcome papers that consider comparative and/or collaborative research, in the future as well as in the present. The conference engages with all the scholarly debates of the emerging fields of Inter-Asia popular music studies, in the following categories or streams:

Stream 1: Theory and Methodology
Stream 2: Production, Circulation and Consumption
Stream 3: History,Geography, Politics
Stream 4: Genre, Identity, Ideology

The organizer of Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference 2014 in Chiang Mai would like to invite paper presenters to send their abstract (not more than 250 words) to iapms2014chiangmai@gmail.com before 25 January 2014. Please don’t forget to write down the ‘stream’ in which you think your paper fits.

Please use the attached Proposal Form (right click to download) when submitting your proposal. Please use your surname as file name (ex. Chua.doc, Douglas.doc). If you plan to organize a panel with more than two people, please coordinate with the panelists to put all the necessary information on one form (e.g., panel title, paper titles, individual abstracts, panelists information). A panel description is not necessary.

Please email all inquiries to: iapms2014chiangmai@gmail.com

2014.1.25 Deadline for abstract submission

2014.02.25 Acceptance of papers

2014.04.25 Registration

2014.07.25 Submission of full paper

2014.08.08-09 Conference Days

Steering Committees

Viriya Sawangchot (API Fellow & Mahidol University, Thailand)

Siriporn Somboonbooran (Walailak University, Thailand)

Atchareeya Saisin (Chiang Mai University, Thailand)

Pitipong Yodmongkol (CAMT, Chiang Mai University)

Napaporn Reeveerakul (CAMT, Chiang Mai University)

Sumet Yodkaew (CAMT, Chiang Mai University)

Organizing Committees

Tunghung HO (Fu-jen Catholic University, Taiwan)

Eva TSAI (National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan)

Anthony FUNG (Chinese University, Hong Kong/China)

Yoshitaka MORI (Tokyo University of the Arts, Japan)

Jeroen Groenwegen-Lau (Independent scholar, Netherlands-China)

Yukie HIRATA (Dokkyo University, Japan)

Sun JUNG (National University of Singapore, Singapore)

Kai Khiun LIEW (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)

Aekyung PARK (Yonsei University, Korea)

Hyunjoon SHIN (Sungkonghoe University, Korea)

Jung-yup LEE (University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA/Korea)

Notes

English is the only language in the conference as there is no common language among Asia language. Translation service can be provided only during Q&A, in case  the presenters need it.

For the updated information about submission, registration, accommodation, transportation etc, please keep visiting our website: http:www.interasiapop.org.

CFP on Feminist Hip Hop Scholarship

Subject: Call for Papers: “All Hail the Queenz: A Queer Feminist Recalibration of Hip Hop Scholarship”

Call for Papers:

“All Hail the Queenz: A Queer Feminist Recalibration of Hip Hop Scholarship”

A Special Issue of *Women and Performance: A Journal of Feminist Theory*.

Issue Guest Editors: Shanté Paradigm Smalls (University of New Mexico) and
Jessica N. Pabón (New York University)**

Submission deadline: *May 1, 2013*

*Women and Performance *invites submissions for a special issue, “All Hail
the Queenz: A Queer Feminist Recalibration of Hip Hop Scholarship.” The
editors welcome scholarly articles and performative texts that foreground
feminist and queer performance studies approaches to hip hop culture,
consumption, and production.

Contemporary rap music, as a stand-in for hip hop culture and production,
is virtually synonymous with misogyny and homophobia in the mainstream US
and academic imaginary. We want to explore the range of understandings and
theories that inform how women and queers experience hip hop culture and
performance; this issue underscores the multiplicity of hip hop culture and
rejects a myopic totalizing view of what “the culture” does and is. We seek
to engage with the wide range of hip hop scholars and practitioners working
at the intersections of various methodologies not always associated with
scholarly considerations of hip hop (including psychoanalysis, feminist and
queer theory, and performance theory), as well as methods typical to hip
hop studies—sociology, Black studies, literature, history, musicology, and
urban studies. An emerging class of hip hop scholars pressure the givens of
race, gender, performance, sexuality, region, nationality, artistry, and
iconography—as a culture that has been in a state of constant development
for the past forty years, hip hop scholarship is more than due for a queer
feminist remixing and reimagining.

As coeditors, we challenge the readers of *Women & Performance* to ask:
What would a specifically queer feminist performance studies approach to
hip hop’s culture and production generate in terms of scholarship? How does
a queer feminist experience and critique revise hip hop studies? Why has
performance studies had so little to say about hip hop, what interventions
does performance studies yield? The issue’s focus on producing knowledge
about hip hop culture that centralizes women, girls and queer people will
include a range of elements, both popular and subcultural: DJ culture,
dance, graffiti, human beat boxing, rap music, as well as fashion, media
and print, organizing, and other forms of knowledge production. No matter
the genre, hip hop is often conceived and misrepresented as a
male-dominated culture which casts women and girls as an addendum to hip
hop rather than as primary producers, critics, and consumers. Within the
pages of this issue, contributors revisit the centrality of feminist and
queer artists to the production of all elements of hip hop culture and of
feminist and queer critique to hip hop scholarship. “All Hail the Queenz”
intends to tease out the nuanced negotiations women, girls, and queer
people develop as hip hop artists, critics, and consumers participating
within this climate.

Through re-centering feminist and queer critiques and female and queer
performance, “All Hail the Queenz” recalibrates hip hop’s center. By
recalibrating the center, contributors to this issue refashion hip hop
historiography and hip hop aesthetics beyond the art of rapping by the
cisgendered male body. In a kind of textual reperformance, this issue takes
its title from Queen Latifah’s lyrical demands for respect on her first
womanist rap classic album, “All Hail the Queen,” and reminds readers once
again that “stereotypes, they got to go!”

Potential Topics:

– Alternate Hip Hop historiographies
– Artist Scholars
– DJing, technology, gender, sexuality
– Feminist, queer, trans* aesthetics
– Feminist, queer, trans* pedagogy
– Graffiti and gender/sexuality
– Hip Hop culture and dis/ability
– Hip Hop diasporas
– Hip Hop fashion
– Hip Hop feminism
– Hip Hop festivals
– Hip Hop’s hybridity
– Human Beatboxing
– Media culture and social networking
– Nation, Empire, and hip hop
– Queer feminist hip hop critique
– Queerness and/in/of hip hop
– Trans* in/and hip hop

Article submissions should be 6-8,000 words in length and adhere to the
current Chicago Manual of Style (CMS), author-date format. Performative
texts should be 2-3,000 words and in any style the author chooses (same CMS
style as above if using citations). Photo essays are welcome. Questions and
abstracts for review are welcome before the final deadline.

Complete essays and texts for consideration must be submitted by 11:59 PM
EST, May 1, 2013.

Please send all work to both Shanté Paradigm Smalls and Jessica N.
Pabón via email (MSWord attachment): shantesmalls@gmail.comand
jnp250@nyu.edu.

Further submission guidelines may be found at:
http://www.womenandperformance.org/submission.html. *Women and Performance* is a
peer reviewed journal published by Routledge, Taylor & Francis.

Thanks for circulating!

Best,

Jessica N. Pabón

ABD, Performance Studies New York University
American Association of University Women Dissertation Fellow, 2012-2013
Curator, bob bar gallery, NYC
Email: jnp250@nyu.edu
Blog: artofgettingovaries.wordpress.com
Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/ArtofGettingOvaries
TedxWomen Talk: http://tedxwomen.org/speakers/jessica-pabon/

CFP: K-pop politics: digital mediation and global fandom

The K-pop frenzy is anything but ordinary. On May 1 this year, some 300 French fans holding Korean national flags gathered in front of the Louvre Museum, calling for additional K-pop concerts to be held in Paris. Similar rallies ensued in London’s Trafalgar Square, Poland’s Warsaw, and Colombia’s Bolívar Square.
Though on a continuum with Hallyu (the Korean Wave), K-Pop departs from the earlier waves of Korean popular culture in its media specificity, geographic scope and generational focus. Preceding currents of Korean popular culture had centered on the cult of Korean television dramas distributed through conventional mass media (terrestrial, satellite, and cable televisions) to neighboring countries such as Japan, China, Taiwan, Vietnam, etc. The K-pop craze, however, is beyond “Asian” bounds. This year alone, K-pop concerts were held in L.A., New York, Paris, London, Sydney, Tokyo, etc., and K-Pop flash mobs continue to take place in such metropolises as Singapore, Lima, Sao Paulo, Toronto, Jakarta, Vancouver, Dublin, Bergen, and Rome.
The global K-pop rage is concurrent with and indebted to the rise of portable devices and what are known as social media. The effect is noticeable in the increased focus on visual aspects of K-pop. For example, South Korean singer Psy’s comic music video “Gangnam Style” has gone viral since it was released on July 15. The video surpassed 100 million hits on You Tube as of Sept 4, 2012, marking it the most-viewed video in such a short period of time. Social media, or social networking services (SNS), play a critical role in this. Songs shared through SNS strengthen online camaraderie, empower those who upload or distribute them, all the while bringing visual and musical experiences on individuated media to a new level.
Catalyzed by Twitter, Facebook, You Tube and online fan club sites, K-pop has emerged as an unambiguous instance of global digital youth culture: a social media-friendly, fan/user-steered, and participation-conducive anthropological occurrence. A unique amalgamation of dance, storytelling, persona, costume play, music, and fashion show, K-pop epitomizes a meta-genre performance in its own right. Accordingly, the cultural ownership or origin/ality of K-pop becomes a moot question, as it consciously espouses a hybridized mode of production. A bold concoction of styles, tunes, and languages borrowed from Europe, America and Japan, K-pop has spawned abundance of derivative local cultures: cover dance competitions, club parties, and fan club conventions.
Despite the transnational thrust, a dominant mode of production in K-pop remains “Korean.” A legion of similar idol bands has cropped up in less than ten years, and they are invariably manufactured and merchandised by a few Korean entertainment agencies. It is often claimed that the omnipotence of those management giants smothers artistic agency with what is known as a “slave contract,” which has sparked major controversies over labor and human right issues of K-pop performers. Fans do chime in and “meddle” with the mis/management of the stars they root for, as attested by the passionate support for JYJ’s debut, a group that broke out of TVXQ. Keenly aware of the growing clout of global fans, the leading management moguls (SM, YG, and JYP) make desperate efforts to stay on good terms with the K-pop devotees.
Aside from the tension between producers and consumers, K-pop has enjoyed a long, unperturbed honeymoon with capital and state power. Since the late 1990s, when entertainment business as a whole was designated as a strategic industry for South Korea, the K-pop enterprise has been a faithful ally to the reign of capital, commodity, fame and nationalist ideology. More often than not, K-pop industry would act as a cheerleader for various state and market affairs in exchange for policy support from various state bureaus and lavish underwritings from conglomerates like Samsung and LG, IT behemoths seeking to cash in on the soaring value of the nation’s cultural capital. Complicit with this state-corporate joint maneuver are ordinary citizens, intellectuals, artists, and mainstream media, whose postcolonial aspiration to see the nation exit from cultural obscurity hazardously awakens nationalist urges intrinsic to the state and capital-led Hallyu/K-pop campaign.
All of the instances necessitate a rigorous politicization of the seemingly innocuous popular music vogue. Hence, the proposed volume asks: what political desire and historical impetus do we find from the unruly diffusion of K-pop; what cultural risks and social stakes do fans in Europe, North America, Latin America, and South East Asia have in espousing the popular culture from a cultural periphery; how is this related to the global disenfranchisement of the youth under the sway of neoliberalism, how does the rise of K-pop respond to global racism and/or cosmopolitanism in culture, and how does it help boost the visibility of ethnic/cultural minorities at large; in what ways does the instance of K-pop inform or contest the conceptual underpinnings of cultural imperialism, cultural globalization, hybridity, transnationalism and traveling culture; what forms of cultural interaction and alliance do social media galvanize through the viral dissemination of K-pop, and what types of cultural authority and social institutions do they play havoc with; how does the K-pop industry establish esthetic and affective connections with ethno-cultural and artistic communities in other parts of the world; what cultural effects does K-pop wreak on other popular cultures as well as on other music genres, domestically and internationally; what correlations or affinities are there between the composite esthetics of K-pop and new forms of communication afforded by social network services; and how does the mediated experience of K-pop facilitate transnational or local cultural practices in such fields as language acquisition, tourism, commodity consumption, plastic surgery, concert-going, friend-making, and so forth?
With these questions in mind, the volume seeks to bring together academic and professional writings on the following areas.
1. Cultural/Political Frameworks: hallyu (Korean wave) and cultural nationalism/transnationalism; European crises; cultural de-westernization; cultural empowerment and global south, etc.
2. Political Economy: state/corporate sponsorship; soft power; nation branding; cultural diplomacy; popular culture as a strategic industry; transnationalism in cultural production, etc.
3. History and Stylistics: history of idol bands; esthetic genealogy of K-pop; group performance and collective identity; linguistic miscegenation; body/gender/sexuality; genre mix; kinship with J-pop or hip hop, etc.
4. Media and Mediation: specific workings and functions of You Tube, Twitter, and Facebook vis-à-vis broadcast mass media; distinct routes/patterns of distribution; specific meaning of “social” media in K-pop; digital mobility and transferability; viral communication and cultural synchronicity, etc.
5. Audience and Fandom: the power of fan clubs/blogs/sites; fan as expert/critic/quasi-manager; metropolitan subculture and the role of minorities/diasporas/sojourners; collectivity and peer culture; cultural capital and race/ethnicity; the meaning of entertainment in generational/youth culture; Japanophile and K-pop; anti-Korean wave movements; K-pop and consumption chains including, but not limited to, fashion, cosmetics, food, and tourism, etc.
The volume will be co-edited by JungBong Choi (NYU) & Roald Maliangkay (Australian National University). In order to be considered, please send your abstract (500~750 words) to JungBong Choi (jbc7@nyu.edu) by Friday, November 2, 2012. Your abstract must include working title, bibliography, and author’s bio (100 words).
The K-pop frenzy is anything but ordinary. On May 1 this year, some 300 French fans holding Korean national flags gathered in front of the Louvre Museum, calling for additional K-pop concerts to be held in Paris. Similar rallies ensued in London’s Trafalgar Square, Poland’s Warsaw, and Colombia’s Bolívar Square.
Though on a continuum with Hallyu (the Korean Wave), K-Pop departs from the earlier waves of Korean popular culture in its media specificity, geographic scope and generational focus. Preceding currents of Korean popular culture had centered on the cult of Korean television dramas distributed through conventional mass media (terrestrial, satellite, and cable televisions) to neighboring countries such as Japan, China, Taiwan, Vietnam, etc. The K-pop craze, however, is beyond “Asian” bounds. This year alone, K-pop concerts were held in L.A., New York, Paris, London, Sydney, Tokyo, etc., and K-Pop flash mobs continue to take place in such metropolises as Singapore, Lima, Sao Paulo, Toronto, Jakarta, Vancouver, Dublin, Bergen, and Rome.
The global K-pop rage is concurrent with and indebted to the rise of portable devices and what are known as social media. The effect is noticeable in the increased focus on visual aspects of K-pop. For example, South Korean singer Psy’s comic music video “Gangnam Style” has gone viral since it was released on July 15. The video surpassed 100 million hits on You Tube as of Sept 4, 2012, marking it the most-viewed video in such a short period of time. Social media, or social networking services (SNS), play a critical role in this. Songs shared through SNS strengthen online camaraderie, empower those who upload or distribute them, all the while bringing visual and musical experiences on individuated media to a new level.
Catalyzed by Twitter, Facebook, You Tube and online fan club sites, K-pop has emerged as an unambiguous instance of global digital youth culture: a social media-friendly, fan/user-steered, and participation-conducive anthropological occurrence. A unique amalgamation of dance, storytelling, persona, costume play, music, and fashion show, K-pop epitomizes a meta-genre performance in its own right. Accordingly, the cultural ownership or origin/ality of K-pop becomes a moot question, as it consciously espouses a hybridized mode of production. A bold concoction of styles, tunes, and languages borrowed from Europe, America and Japan, K-pop has spawned abundance of derivative local cultures: cover dance competitions, club parties, and fan club conventions.
Despite the transnational thrust, a dominant mode of production in K-pop remains “Korean.” A legion of similar idol bands has cropped up in less than ten years, and they are invariably manufactured and merchandised by a few Korean entertainment agencies. It is often claimed that the omnipotence of those management giants smothers artistic agency with what is known as a “slave contract,” which has sparked major controversies over labor and human right issues of K-pop performers. Fans do chime in and “meddle” with the mis/management of the stars they root for, as attested by the passionate support for JYJ’s debut, a group that broke out of TVXQ. Keenly aware of the growing clout of global fans, the leading management moguls (SM, YG, and JYP) make desperate efforts to stay on good terms with the K-pop devotees.
Aside from the tension between producers and consumers, K-pop has enjoyed a long, unperturbed honeymoon with capital and state power. Since the late 1990s, when entertainment business as a whole was designated as a strategic industry for South Korea, the K-pop enterprise has been a faithful ally to the reign of capital, commodity, fame and nationalist ideology. More often than not, K-pop industry would act as a cheerleader for various state and market affairs in exchange for policy support from various state bureaus and lavish underwritings from conglomerates like Samsung and LG, IT behemoths seeking to cash in on the soaring value of the nation’s cultural capital. Complicit with this state-corporate joint maneuver are ordinary citizens, intellectuals, artists, and mainstream media, whose postcolonial aspiration to see the nation exit from cultural obscurity hazardously awakens nationalist urges intrinsic to the state and capital-led Hallyu/K-pop campaign.
All of the instances necessitate a rigorous politicization of the seemingly innocuous popular music vogue. Hence, the proposed volume asks: what political desire and historical impetus do we find from the unruly diffusion of K-pop; what cultural risks and social stakes do fans in Europe, North America, Latin America, and South East Asia have in espousing the popular culture from a cultural periphery; how is this related to the global disenfranchisement of the youth under the sway of neoliberalism, how does the rise of K-pop respond to global racism and/or cosmopolitanism in culture, and how does it help boost the visibility of ethnic/cultural minorities at large; in what ways does the instance of K-pop inform or contest the conceptual underpinnings of cultural imperialism, cultural globalization, hybridity, transnationalism and traveling culture; what forms of cultural interaction and alliance do social media galvanize through the viral dissemination of K-pop, and what types of cultural authority and social institutions do they play havoc with; how does the K-pop industry establish esthetic and affective connections with ethno-cultural and artistic communities in other parts of the world; what cultural effects does K-pop wreak on other popular cultures as well as on other music genres, domestically and internationally; what correlations or affinities are there between the composite esthetics of K-pop and new forms of communication afforded by social network services; and how does the mediated experience of K-pop facilitate transnational or local cultural practices in such fields as language acquisition, tourism, commodity consumption, plastic surgery, concert-going, friend-making, and so forth?
With these questions in mind, the volume seeks to bring together academic and professional writings on the following areas.
1. Cultural/Political Frameworks: hallyu (Korean wave) and cultural nationalism/transnationalism; European crises; cultural de-westernization; cultural empowerment and global south, etc.
2. Political Economy: state/corporate sponsorship; soft power; nation branding; cultural diplomacy; popular culture as a strategic industry; transnationalism in cultural production, etc.
3. History and Stylistics: history of idol bands; esthetic genealogy of K-pop; group performance and collective identity; linguistic miscegenation; body/gender/sexuality; genre mix; kinship with J-pop or hip hop, etc.
4. Media and Mediation: specific workings and functions of You Tube, Twitter, and Facebook vis-à-vis broadcast mass media; distinct routes/patterns of distribution; specific meaning of “social” media in K-pop; digital mobility and transferability; viral communication and cultural synchronicity, etc.
5. Audience and Fandom: the power of fan clubs/blogs/sites; fan as expert/critic/quasi-manager; metropolitan subculture and the role of minorities/diasporas/sojourners; collectivity and peer culture; cultural capital and race/ethnicity; the meaning of entertainment in generational/youth culture; Japanophile and K-pop; anti-Korean wave movements; K-pop and consumption chains including, but not limited to, fashion, cosmetics, food, and tourism, etc.
The volume will be co-edited by JungBong Choi (NYU) & Roald Maliangkay (Australian National University). In order to be considered, please send your abstract (500~750 words) to JungBong Choi (jbc7@nyu.edu) by Friday, November 2, 2012. Your abstract must include working title, bibliography, and author’s bio (100 words).

**Updated CFP** Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference (Deadline: January 31, 2012)

THE 3rd INTER-ASIA POPULAR MUSIC STUDIES CONFERENCE (2012, TAIPEI)

CALL FOR PAPERS Updated! With Proposal Form and Hotel Info

Proposal Deadline: January 31, 2012

DATE: July 13 (Fri) – 15 (Sun), 2012

VENUE: National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan

ORGANIZERS:

*Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Group (https://interasiapop.org/)

*Graduate Institute of Mass Communication, National Taiwan Normal University

*Department of Psychology, Fu Jen Catholic University

STATEMENT:

We are pleased to announce the 3rd Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies (IAPMS) Conference, which will take place on July 13-15, 2012 in Taipei, in collaboration with the Department of Psychology at Fu Jen Catholic University and the Graduate Institute of Mass Communication at National Taiwan Normal University. Following the first conference in Osaka in 2008 and the second conference in Hong Kong in 2010, we move our next meeting to Taipei—hub of vibrant indie music scenes and Mandarin pop music industries.

The studies on Asian popular music are still in its embryonic stage. There is neither a university program in Asia devoted to popular music studies nor a journal dedicated to the exploration of Asian popular music. What we have now is an online-based, transnational research portal that began in 2007, the Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Group, plus a rapidly expanding research network that at the moment includes 80 scholars not only in Asia but also in Europe, America and Oceania. The organization is young and enthusiastic about the rising academic interest in Asian popular music both inside and outside Asia. There is a growing feeling that Asian popular music has not received sufficient attention from international popular music studies and that the existing paradigms of popular music studies may not be adequate in understanding the culture, economies, and histories of Asian popular music. The IAPMS biennial conference is meant to foster scholarly conversations surrounding the emerging field of Inter-Asia popular music studies.

CONFERENCE THEME:

WAYS OF LISTENING: How do we listen to pop music in/from Asia, and how can we talk about it?

Pop music lovers, makers, and critics take the activity of listening to music for granted. Yet it is not always easy to express our/my listening experiences to others. It is even more challenging to elaborate the social and cultural implications of the differing responses.

Can the question, “how do we listen to pop music” prompt interest in the “ways of listening”?

For example, who is listening to Asian pop music? What constitutes pop music listening? Where does music-listening take place? What activities and connections accompany the act of listening? How is everyday life organized through music listening? What personal, social, affective, and technological experiments have seeped through pop music listening? How do the recording and consumer’s technologies affect the ways of listening in contemporary and historical Asian contexts? Do musicians and critics listen to music and do they do music differently from “ordinary” music fans? Can music listening be creative practices? How are the ways of listening linked to various moments and results of production? How have listening and interpretive practices transformed Asian pop music as social distinction, identity markers, professional knowledge, genres, businesses, and markets?

We invite paper proposals that will investigate, elaborate, contextualize, and historicize the experiences of listening to (Asian) pop music globally and/or in Asia. We welcome papers that address moments that open up to expression and conversation about how people engage pop music. Since this could be a task beyond the measure of words, we invite you to turn the thematic question around with an attitude, such as, “Hey! This is how “we/I/they” action Asian pop music!”

We welcome both individual paper and panel proposals under the umbrella theme. In addition, we welcome individual and panel proposals for the following panel themes geared toward publication projects:

-Current issues in Asian popular music studies

-Research methodologies for the studies of Asian popular music

-Pop music, cultural variability and globalization

M.A. and Ph.D. students: IAPMS∙2012∙Taipei features a postgraduate day! Please consider submitting a proposal!

HOW TO SUBMIT PROPOSALS:

The organizers of IAPMS∙2012∙Taipei would like to invite interested participants to send your abstracts of no more than 250 words to iapms2012taipei@gmail.com before January 31, 2012.

We welcome individual and panel proposals from scholars, students, and industry practitioners. Please include the following information when submitting an individual or panel proposal:

(1)       Paper title

(2)       Panel title (optional)

(3)       Name(s)

(4)       Affiliation(s)

(5)       Address(es)

(6)       Email(s)

(7)       Postgraduate session(optional)

(8)       Short bio (max. 100 words)

(9)       Proposal abstract (max. 250 words). Panel organizers, please submit all individual abstracts. There is no need to submit a panel description.

(10)    Keywords (up to 5 words)

LANGUAGE: Given the diverse languages spoken in Asia, English will be the working language for the conference. Given the presence of many bilingual and multi-lingual speakers in Asia, translation service may become available during Q/A, upon request. We welcome multi-lingual participants to volunteer their service. Please contact us if you are willing to help.

Please email all inquiries to: iapms2012taipei@gmail.com

TIMELINE AND DEADLINES

2011.08.31           Announcing call-for-papers

2012.01.31           Deadline for submitting proposals

2012.02.29           Announcing accepted proposals

2012.03.31           Announcing conference program and information on

registration, travel, and accommodation

2012.06.31           Deadline for submitting full papers

2012.07.13           Conference begins

2012.07.15           Conference ends

REGISTRATION FEE

Waged members: NT$ 800 (=US$ 30)

Unwaged members: NT$ 400 (=US$ 15)

ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

Tunghung HO (Fu-jen Catholic University, Taiwan)

Eva TSAI (National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan)

Miao-Ju JIAN (National Chung-Cheng University, Taiwan)

Anthony FUNG (Chinese University, Hong Kong/China)

Yoshitaka MORI (Tokyo University of the Arts, Japan)

Kai Khiun LIEW (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)

Yukie HIRATA (Dokkyo University, Japan)

Hyunjoon SHIN (Sungkonghoe University, Korea)

Jung-Yup LEE (University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA/Korea)

NOTES

Please observe that this conference is scheduled after the ACS Crossroads 2012 Conference in Paris (July 2-6, 2012). For more information on that conference please go to: http://www.crossroads2012.org/?q=en/node/26

Hotels and Hostels Within 15-Minute Walk from NTNU:
1. Dolamanco Hotel, (Xinyi Rd., across from Daan Park, near Yongkang Jie), US $68-$70 for a double room.
Tel: +886-2-2700-1200
Website: http://www.dolamanco.com.tw/en/index.php
2.Dandy Hotel(Xinyi St., across from Daan Park, near Yongkang Jie), US $73-$75 for a standard room.
Tel: +886-2-27076899
Website: http://www.dandyhotel.com.tw/EN/DandyD/index.aspx
3. Rido Hotel (Xinyi Rd., across from Daan Park, near Yongkang Jie), US $ 81-$93 for a room depending on the theme.

Tel: +886-2-2706-5600

Website: http://www.rido.com.tw/about_en.php

3. NTNU Hall, (on campus, MRT Taipower Building Station or MRT Guting Station), US $36-$40 for a room. Curfew restriction 11:30pm-6:00am. Can accommodate if the guest needs to catch an early flight. We can reserve for you and get a discount.

Tel: +886-2-77345800
Website: http://140.122.109.88/eweb/

4. NTNU Guesthouse, (on campus, MRT Taipower Building Station or MRT Guting Station), US $75-$85 for a double room. Curfew restriction 11:30pm-6:00am. Can accommodate if the guest needs to catch an early flight. We can reserve for you and get a discount.

Tel: +886-2-77345800
Website: http://140.122.109.88/eweb/
5. Chocolate Box Backpackers Hostel(PuCheng St., MRT Taipower Building Station, close to Shida night market), US $16-$18 to US $43-$45 depending on the room type.
Tel: +886-988-618953 or  +886-2-23645848 (overseas)
Website: http://www.chocolatebox-backpackers.com/
6. Fun Taipei Backpacker Hostel (Shida Rd., MRT Taipower Building Station) US $16-$18 up.
Email: funtpe@gmail.com
Website: http://www.facebook.com/topic.php?uid=210438787841&topic=15509#!/profile.php?id=100000972543774
7. Tai-an Hotel (Heping E. Rd., MRT Guting Station), US $31-$32 for a single room. We can make a reservation for you.
Tel: +886-2-23910288 or +886-2-23214653 (no website)

Add: 2-4F., No.99, Sec. 1, Heping E. Rd., Da’an Dist., Taipei City
8. Tree House Hostel (Heping E. Rd., MRT Guting Station, close to Shida night market).
Email: tthhostel@gmail.com
Tel:+886-986-677837
Website: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Tree-House/107696675967182#!/pages/Tree-House/107696675967182?sk=info

9. Yo Xing Regency Hotel(Heping W. Rd., MRT Guting Station Exit No.8), online booking price US $60-62 for a double room.
Tel : +886-2-23943121
Website: http://en.yoxing.tw/
10. Howard Civil Service International House,(Xinsheng S. Rd., MRT Taipower Building Station Exit 2, close to Daan Park, Shida night market, and NTU campus), US $85-$87 for a standard single room.
Tel: +886-2-83691155
Website: http://intl-house.howard-hotels.com/?Lsn=2
11. Li Yuan Hotel (Roosevelt Rd., MRT Taipower Building Station Exit No.4, close to Shida night market). US$75-$77 for an executive room (lowest price).
Tel: +886-2-23657367
Website: http://www.liyuan.tw/room_en.php

12. Yo Yo Stay (at Shida night market). This hostel provides 4-person shared-studio(US$ 52-54) and 6-people-shared-room(US$32-34).

Tel: +886-966-222-041

Website: http://yoyostay.pixnet.net/blog

CFP: THE 3rd INTER-ASIA POPULAR MUSIC STUDIES CONFERENCE (Taipei, 2012)

DATE: July 13 (Fri) – 15 (Sun), 2012, featuring Postgraduate Sessions on July 13

VENUE: Lecture Hall (first floor) and Audio-Visual Room (second floor), Extension School of Continuing Education Building, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan

Campus map: http://www.ntnu.edu.tw/ga/map/images/ntnu_map2.jpg

ORGANIZERS:

Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Group (https://interasiapop.org/)

Department of Psychology, Fu Jen Catholic University

Graduate Institute of Mass Communication, National Taiwan Normal University

STATEMENT:

We are pleased to announce the 3rd Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies (IAPMS) Conference, which will take place on July 13-15, 2012 in Taipei, in collaboration with the Department of Psychology at Fu Jen Catholic University and the Graduate Institute of Mass Communication at National Taiwan Normal University. Following the first conference in Osaka in 2008 and the second conference in Hong Kong in 2010, we move our next meeting to Taipei—hub of vibrant indie music scenes and Mandarin pop music industries.

The studies on Asian popular music are still in its embryonic stage. There is neither a university program in Asia devoted to popular music studies nor a journal dedicated to the exploration of Asian popular music. What we have now is an online-based, transnational research portal that began in 2007, the Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Group, plus a rapidly expanding research network that at the moment includes 80 scholars not only in Asia but also in Europe, America and Oceania. The organization is young and enthusiastic about the rising academic interest in Asian popular music both inside and outside Asia. There is a growing feeling that Asian popular music has not received sufficient attention from international popular music studies and that the existing paradigms of popular music studies may not be adequate in understanding the culture, economies, and histories of Asian popular music. The IAPMS biennial conference is meant to foster scholarly conversations surrounding the emerging field of Inter-Asia popular music studies.

CONFERENCE THEME (IAPMS∙2012∙Taipei):

WAYS OF LISTENING: How do we listen to pop music in/from Asia, and how can we talk about it?

Pop music lovers, makers, and critics take the activity of listening to music for granted. Yet it is not always easy to express our/my listening experiences to others. It is even more challenging to elaborate the social and cultural implications of the differing responses.

Can the question, “how do we listen to pop music” prompt interest in the “ways of listening”?

For example, who is listening to Asian pop music? What constitutes pop music listening? Where does music-listening take place? What activities and connections accompany the act of listening? How is everyday life organized through music listening? What personal, social, affective, and technological experiments have seeped through pop music listening? How do the recording and consumer’s technologies affect the ways of listening in contemporary and historical Asian contexts? Do musicians and critics listen to music and do they do music differently from “ordinary” music fans? Can music listening be creative practices? How are the ways of listening linked to various moments and results of production? How have listening and interpretive practices transformed Asian pop music as social distinction, identity markers, professional knowledge, genres, businesses, and markets?

We invite paper proposals that will investigate, elaborate, contextualize, and historicize the experiences of listening to (Asian) pop music globally and/or in Asia. We welcome papers that address moments that open up to expression and conversation about how people engage pop music. Since this could be a task beyond the measure of words, we invite you to turn the thematic question around with an attitude, such as, “Hey! This is how “we/I/they” action Asian pop music!”

We welcome both individual paper and panel proposals under the umbrella theme. In addition, we welcome individual and panel proposals for the following panel themes geared toward publication projects:

-Current issues in Asian popular music studies

-Research methodologies for the studies of Asian popular music

-Pop music, cultural variability and globalization

M.A. and Ph.D. students: IAPMS∙2012∙Taipei features a postgraduate day! Please consider submitting a proposal!

HOW TO SUBMIT PROPOSALS:

The organizers of IAPMS∙2012∙Taipei would like to invite interested participants to send your abstracts of no more than 250 words to iapms2012taipei@gmail.com before January 31, 2012.

Please use the attached Proposal Form (right click to download) when submitting your proposal. If you plan to organize a panel with more than two people, please coordinate with the panelists to put all the necessary information on one form (e.g., panel title, paper titles, individual abstracts, panelists information). A panel description is not necessary.

LANGUAGE: Given the diverse languages spoken in Asia, English will be the working language for the conference. Given the presence of many bilingual and multi-lingual speakers in Asia, translation service may become available during Q/A, upon request. We welcome multi-lingual participants to volunteer their service. Please contact us if you are willing to help.

Please email all inquiries to: iapms2012taipei@gmail.com

TIMELINE AND DEADLINES

2011.08.31              Announcing call-for-papers

2012.01.31              Deadline for submitting proposals

2012.02.29              Announcing accepted proposals

2012.03.31              Announcing conference program and information on

registration, travel, and accommodation

2012.06.31              Deadline for submitting full papers

2012.07.13              Conference begins

2012.07.15              Conference ends

REGISTRATION FEE

Waged members: NT$ 800 (=US$ 30)

Unwaged members: NT$ 400 (=US$ 15)

ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

Tunghung HO (Fu-jen Catholic University, Taiwan)

Eva TSAI (National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan)

Miao-Ju JIAN (National Chung-Cheng University, Taiwan)

Anthony FUNG (Chinese University, Hong Kong/China)

Yoshitaka MORI (Tokyo University of the Arts, Japan)

Kai Khiun LIEW (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)

Yukie HIRATA (Dokkyo University, Japan)

Hyunjoon SHIN (Sungkonghoe University, Korea)

Jung-Yup LEE (University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA/Korea)

NOTES

Please observe that this conference is scheduled after the ACS Crossroads 2012 Conference in Paris. For more information on that conference please go to: http://www.crossroads2012.org/?q=en/node/26