cfp: XX Biennial IASPM Conference (Canberra, Australia, 24-28 June, 2019)

Turns and Revolutions in Popular Music Studies

XX Biennial IASPM Conference
School of Music, The Australian National University
Canberra, Australia, 24–28 June 2019

Call for Presentations

As certain songsters and songstresses have noted, seasons turn, turn, turn, even if you are talking about a revolution. While global warming alters seasonal cycles with the aid of neoliberal and (pseudo)socialist forms of capitalism, and waves of societal turmoil follow each other with varying degrees of authoritarianism in different parts of the world, popular music studies remains committed to critical enquiry of music of the masses, the everyday, a variety of subcultures, the megastars, all with their revolutionary potential. Faced with the increasing worldwide austerity in the humanities and social sciences, caused by short-sighted research funding policies that purportedly aim at revolutionary technological and business innovations, popular music studies also struggles with its future directions. Whither popular music studies and where to turn?

Popular music studies in its institutional form is approaching the end of its youthful years, and IASPM will celebrate its twentieth biennial conference in Canberra. This provides also an opportunity to turn to the past and reconsider what may be learned from the twists and shouts of the previous decades. How have recent affective, neomaterialist, performative, post-humanist, spatial, transnational and visual turns, among others, affected popular music studies, and what might the emergent or future disciplinary turns be? Or to what extent do the turns and revolutions within popular music studies signal an excessive neoliberal belief in constant innovation that implies a lack of thorough investigation of the field’s intellectual history? How are the politics of higher education changing the field’s history of critical research and challenging its civic agenda?

To address these issues, as well as any other questions and topics related to the past, present and future turns and revolutions of popular music studies, the International Association for the Study of Popular Music invites proposals for the twentieth biennial conference, to be held at the School of Music at the Australian National University in Canberra 24–28 June 2019. The general theme of the conference is divided into six interrelated streams:

a) Temporal turns and revolutions. In recent years there has been a pronounced interest in popular music as cultural heritage. Alongside issues of heritagisation, this stream accommodates topics relating to nostalgia, history, historiography and futurology alike, and any other aspect involving temporal relations within popular music studies.

b) Spatial turns and revolutions. As popular music studies is a global field of enquiry, debates emerge concerning the key geographical loci of its knowledge production. This stream welcomes discussion on the centrality of Western conceptualisations of popular music and their challenges, including the variety of centre–periphery relations, “locals” versus “newcomers”, migration and displacement. Furthermore, how are issues of space and place dealt with in the field, including such liminal circumstances as festivals?

c) Technological turns and revolutions. Media studies approaches constitute a dominant strand of popular music studies, and in addition to issues of media, mediation, mediatisation, et cetera, this stream invites topics that address all dimensions of popular music and technology, whether conceived as practical technical solutions or more abstract logic behind the use of various tools and techniques. A particularly relevant theme in this stream is the presence of technological elements in all stages of the music industry, from production to consumption, and how they blur the lines between live, recorded and streamed music experiences. Additionally, how is technology inspiring aesthetic choices, also in terms of post-digital backlash?

d) Political turns and revolutions. Popular music studies, however defined, is intimately associated with questions of power relations and hence with politics. In an age of global migration, extremist populism, global warming and #metoo, the politics of popular music are implicated in issues of racism, ecological activism and gender and sexual discrimination in particular. Presentations focussing on identity, intersectionality, and more generally, inclusivity are especially welcome, as well as those that address the socio-historical shifts in protest music, however conceived.

e) Theoretical turns and revolutions. How has the inherent interdisciplinary nature of the field evolved during the last decades? How have “popular” and “music” been – and continue to be – understood in the field, and how is their “study” or “analysis” conceived? Furthermore, how are the theoretical and methodological choices that popular music scholars make today likely to affect the field’s “health and wellbeing” in the future? Of particular relevance here are topics that deal with conceptual curves and conflicts within popular music studies, whether stemming from feminism, Marxism, postcolonialism, semiotics, music analysis, or any strand of music theory in its broadest sense.

f) Affective turns and revolutions. Issues of feeling, emotion and pleasure have been central in the study of popular music, in part because of the importance granted to forms of stardom and fandom. Alongside such questions, this stream tackles additional aspects of affective attunements and alliances within popular music and its scholarly investigation.

Academic Committee

Pablo Alabarces, Emilia Barna, Sam de Boise, Giacomo Bottà, Diego García Peinazo, Elsa Grassy, Florian Heesch, Sarah Hill, Fabian Holt, Nadine Hubbs, Laura Jordán González, Akitsugu Kawamoto, Pil Ho Kim, Serge Lacasse, Kristin McGee, Isabella Pek, Rosa Reitsamer (co-chair), Geoff Stahl (co-chair).

Local Organising Committee

Samantha Bennett (chair), Catherine Hoad, Di Hughes, Stephen Loy, Bonnie McConnell, Pat O’Grady, Georgia Pike, Julie Rickwood, Geoff Stahl, Catherine Strong, Aleisha Ward, Samuel Whiting, Kirsten Zemke.

Abstracts

There will be four options: panels (of 3 or 4 presenters), individual papers, film/video presentations, or poster sessions. Panels and individual papers may also be delivered as practice-based presentations, featuring performance-based, composition-based, recording-based or multimedia-based research. In case of practice-based presentations, please make sure to include a description of room and/or technical requirements. In addition, online presentations may be considered for inclusion in the programme, yet priority is given to on-site participation.

Panels

Proposals of organized panels are strongly recommended (two-hour long sessions with four papers, or three papers and a discussant). Each session should leave at least 30 minutes for discussion or for comments by a discussant immediately following the presentations. The panel organizer should submit the panel abstract and all individual abstracts (200 words each) in one document, with a full list of participant names and email addresses. Where an independently submitted abstract appears to fit a panel, the Academic Committee may suggest the addition of a panellist.

Papers

We invite abstracts of no longer than 200 words, including five keywords for programming purposes and an optional list of references (max 10). Individual paper presentations are 20 minutes long to be followed by 10 minutes of discussion.

Film/video session

Recently completed films introduced by their author and discussed by conference participants may be proposed. Submit a 200-word abstract including titles, subjects, and formats, and indicate the duration of the proposed films/videos and introduction/discussion.

Poster session

A space where presenters can exhibit posters will be provided. A 200-word abstract by the poster’s author, including five keywords for programming purposes, must be submitted.

Submission

Please email your abstract no later than 31 July 2018, as a doc/odt/rtf attachment to iaspm2019@anu.edu.au. Please name the file with your surname (eg. Ciccone.docx). The following format should be used:

• Name, affiliation and contact email address
• Type of presentation (select one from: panel, individual paper, film/video, poster)
• Stream (select preferably one but not more than two from: Temporal/Spatial/Technological/Political/Theoretical/Affective Turns and Revolutions)
• Title of presentation
• Abstract (200 words maximum; in the case of panels, include a general abstract followed by individual abstracts, in total 1000 words maximum)
• Five keywords
• Bio (80 words maximum; in case of panels, bios of all participants)

Abstracts will be accepted in English, IASPM’s official language. Papers in all other languages are allowed, if accompanied by a visual presentation in English. Letters of acceptance will be sent by 30 September 2018.

Each participant must be a member of IASPM: http://www.iaspm.net/how-to-join. Each participant may present only one paper at the Conference, but may also preside over a panel or serve as a discussant.

The conference organisers look forward to receiving your submissions!

With kindest regards

IASPM Executive Committee:
Julio Mendivil, Chair
Jacopo Conti
Marta García Quiñones
Antti-Ville Kärjä
Kimi Kärki
Sílvia Martínez
Ann Werner

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Call for Proposals: IASPM-SEA Conference 2019

Call for Proposals: IASPM-SEA Conference 2019

‘Popular x Traditional’

11-13 January 2019, RUANG Think City, Kuala Lumpur

Deadline for abstracts: 31 August 2018

The IASPM-SEA Conference (IASPM-SEA 2019), hosted by RUANG Think City, will take place on Friday 11th to Sunday 13th January 2019 at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. This international conference will feature research and performances about the interaction, convergence and contestation of popular music with traditional music in Southeast Asia. We also welcome proposals of / from / on any region that relate to the conference theme or subthemes.

Aside from aesthetic approaches that merge local traditions with global popular music styles, the conference also seeks to question the notion of the popular in relation to the traditional. It is often overlooked that currently considered traditional musics were once popular art forms, either practiced communally (in sites of worship, villages, homes, ritual festivities) or consumed commercially (in records, films, cassettes, concert halls). However, postcolonial states in the region continually seek to construct and perpetuate a primordial expression of national identity, sourced in invented traditions that have resulted in homogenous boundaries of musical culture. In truth, the popular is in constant dialogue with the traditional, as musical practices and styles adapt and change in a process mediated by human actors in ever-changing historical, political, social and cultural contexts.

Thus, the theme of ‘Popular x Traditional’ invites participants to think beyond such the oppositional divide between the two terms in music practice and scholarship, drawing attention to the fluid interchanges and continual adaptations of music-making in the context of distinct national, ethnic and cultural identities expressed in an increasingly commodified and digitally-mediated world.

Keynote speakers

– To be announced

Conference Themes

– Popular x Traditional

– Local x Global

– Art x Commercial

– Performance x Production

– Analog x Digital

– Independent x Mainstream

– Religious x Secular

Proposal categories
– Papers (20 minutes maximum, with 10 minutes for discussion)
– Paper sessions (three or four papers, each of 20 minutes maximum, with 10 minutes per paper for discussion)
– Roundtable discussions (up to 6 participants, each giving a short position paper, followed by a general discussion, total running time of 90 or 120 minutes)
– Recitals, lecture-recitals and lectures illustrated by sound diffusions or audio-visual screenings (maximum duration 90 minutes)

Proposal guidelines
– For individual papers: up to 250 words
– For paper sessions: 250-word (maximum) summary and up to 200 words for each session participant
– For roundtable discussions: 250-word (maximum) and up to 150 words for each panel participant
– For recitals, lecture-recitals and lectures illustrated by sound diffusions or audio-visual screenings: 250 word (maximum) summary, plus participant CVs and recordings / scores / other details of works to be included in the event (contact the organizing committee to discuss)

Further information for applicants
– Proposals must be sent by email as a MS Word or PDF attachment to iaspm.sea@gmail.com.
– Proposals need not be anonymised.
– All enquiries should be sent to Ken-Ny via iaspm.sea@gmail.com.

Programme committee:

Adil Johan (UKM, Malaysia)

Citra Aryandari (ISI Yogyakarta, Indonesia)

Raja Iskandar Halid (UMK, Malaysia)

Liew Kai Khiun (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)

Viriya Sawangchot (Inter-Asia School, Thailand)

Sarah Hill (Cardiff University, UK)

Proposal submission deadline:

31 August 2018.

Applicants will be notified by 30 September 2018.

Conference Travel Information

Visa
The type of visa will depend on the nationality of the visitor. When you search for visa, please visit the official Australian government website https://www.border.gov.au/. All the information that a legitimate visitor to Australia can be found there.
Note: Please don’t go through the various visa finder websites that often ask for money (beyond the normal visas processing fees (if they apply), ask for endless documentation (an issue in itself) and hold up the process.

Transportation
It is recommended to buy a Myki card to use for trains, trams and buses: https://www.ptv.vic.gov.au/tickets/myki. The quickest and cheapest way to get Caulfield campus from the city is by a 15 minute train ride. About the journey planner, you can check at http://www.metrotrains.com.au/.

Accommodation
Below is a short list of budget hotels between the City and Caulfield campus. There are more options in the City, and you can check at the websites such as hostelbookers.com and hostelworld.com.

Punthill South Yarra
Located near South Yarra train station
Price: Approx $100 per night
Website: http://www.punthill.com.au/specials-and-packages/melbourne-specials/

Adina Apartment Hotel South Yarra
52 Darling St South Yarra, VIC 3141 Australia – short walk to the South Yarra train station – can catch Frankston/ Pakenham/ Cranbourne/ Dandenong train to Caulfield.
Price: Approx $107 per night, otherwise approx. $150 (if booked 45 days prior to stay)
website: https://www.tfehotels.com/brands/adina-apartment-hotels?_ga=1.221911000.1397185684.1475624100

Ibis Styles Melbourne, The Victoria Hotel
Location: 214 Little Collins St, Melbourne. – take train on the Frankston/ Pakenham/ Dandenong or Cranbourne lines to Caulfield.
Price: Approx $100 per night
website: https://www.victoriahotel.com.au/book-now/

Bayview on the park
Location: 42 Queens Road, Melbourne – short walk to tram stop (Tram route 3), that takes you straight to Caulfield Campus, Monash University.
Price: Approx $90 – $125 per night
website: https://book.revato.com/grid?Propertyid=4064&checkin=2016-12-11&checkout=2016-12-12&source=GOO&Label=546193028&roomid=(ROOMID)&languageCode=EN&clientCountryCode=US&currencyCode=AUD

Carnegie Motor Inn
Location: 1102 Dandenong Road, Carnegie – 10 minute walk to Carnegie Station and then catch train to Caulfield or a 20 minute walk.
Price: Approx $130 per night
Website: http://www.carnegiemotorinn.com.au/

Conference News: Registration and more

  1. REGISTRATION FEE
    You can pay the registration fee only by credit card in advance. It is not possible to pay it in cash on site. Monash University will send an email to each registered people about the online payment information. The payment deadline is 25 Nov, which is absolute for preparing catering service during the conference days.
  2. FULL PAPAER NOT NEEDED
    We do not require full papers before the conference. However, we plan to edit special issues on Asian popular music. If you would like to have earlier considerations, please do submit your full papers to Anthony Fung at anthonyfung@cuhk.edu.edu.hk. These papers should fall into one of fourcategories below: Theory and Methodology / Production, Circulation and Consumption / Politics and Power / Identity, Ideology, Affect.

CFP: The 5th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference 2016 in Melbourne (Australia)

* Note: The deadline is extended to May 25.

CFP: The 5th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference 2016 in Melbourne (Australia)

Date: 11-12 December 2016, (Sunday-Monday)

Venue: Monash Asia Institute (MAI), Monash University, Caulfield Campus

900 Dandenong Road, Caulfield East, Victoria 3145, Australia (Melway Ref: 68 F1)

* For information on travelling to Caulfield campus (how to get to, parking and map), please visit Monash University Caulfield campus and Google Maps.  Getting There will be helpful to travel Melbourne.

 

Organized by:

Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Group (IAPMS group),

Monash Asia Institute & School of Media, Film and Journalism, , Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

KEY NOTE SPEAKER: Andy Bennett (Griffith University)

Music (Post)subcultures and Scenes in Asia: Towards a Rethinking of Concepts and Theories

PLENARY SESSION: Koichi Iwabuchi (Manash University), Shane Homan (Monash University) et al.

Australia in Inter-Asian Pop Music Flows/connections

 

STATEMENT

We are pleased to announce the 5th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference, which will take place on December 10-11, 2016 in Melbourne, in collaboration with Monash Asia Institute and School of Media, Film and Journalism, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. Following the first conference in Osaka in 2008, the second conference in Hong Kong in 2010, the third conference in Taipei in 2012, and the fourth conference in Chiang Mai, we move our next meeting to Australia, a country which geographically belongs to ‘Asia’ and has a large population of Asian backgrounds and many people working with musicians and producers in other parts of Asia.

Founded in 2008, Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Group (IAPMS group) is a research network that at the moment includes 120 scholars not only in Asia but also in Europe, America and Oceania. Through its biennial conferences and related activities, the group provides a platform to foster scholarly conversations and collaborations arising from the growing academic interest in Asian popular music both inside and outside Asia.

CONFERENCE THEME (IAPMS∙2016∙Melbourne):

Reframing Asian Popular Music in Time-Place

In retrospect, Shuhei Hosokawa’s 1998 prediction in his book Karaoke Around the World sounds rather premature when he claimed, “There exists no ‘Asian’ pop but various forms of pop music in Asia.” Despite what seemed at the time the unbridgeable cultural, linguistic, religious and ethnic differences, decades of intensified trans-Asia cultural traffic has generated some seminal forms of ‘Asian’ pop music that entertain people across the national borders. Furthermore, there emerges a new batch of pop music that bears the influence of these new forms throughout East and Southeast Asia. Through the practices of relentless emulation, adaptation and referencing, some stylitically coherent, regionally based pop music is being created. So we have J-pop (Japanese pop), K-pop (Korean pop), M-pop (Mandarin pop), V-pop (Vietnamese pop), T-pop (Thai pop), I-pop (Indo pop), L-pop (Lao pop) and so on which, despite different prefixes, do not sound and look very far apart from each other.

The emergence of pan-Asian pop in country-coded names is the latest development unfolding in front of our eyes. However, we still do not have a large stock of shared knowledge about pop music of Asia beyond the glossy surface of the hiphenated pop, In particular, we barely know other Asian countries’s or regions’s histories, cultures and traditions of pop music. This lack of shared knowledge is becoming one of the main obstacles to re-imagining and and constructing Asian pop as a concrete entity. Thus, any constructive inquiry into Asian pop needs to delve deep into each country/region’s rich legacy of popular music and render visible what is increasingly being erased, forgotten and buried.

For this purpose, we propose a rethinking of Asian pop through a frame of time-place. Asian people are not familiar with the idea of Asian pop as a common currency as popular music of the continent has been narrativized firmly along the lines of the national and/or the ethnic. By bringing the subnational to the fore, we would like to introduce a new way of thinking/talking about Asian pop and take a step forward from rather abstract and often unproductive categories of the national and the ethnㅑc. Eschewing the existing way of addressing Asian pop in terms of nationality and/or ethnicity, we propose a research agendum of “Asian pop in particular time and place”. Here, Asian pop will appear in the form of, say, ‘1920s Osaka’, ‘1940s Shanghai’, ‘1950s Bangkok’, ‘1970s Manila’, ‘1980s Beijing’, ‘1990s Tainan’, ‘2000s Bandung’ rather than the tired classification of K-pop, J-pop, Canto-pop and so on.

Furthermore, the 2016 conference will be a great occasion to reconsider the inclusiveness of “Asian” and “Inter-Asia” by examining how Australia has been already and always part of Asian pop music flows and connections. Geographically located in the fringe of “Asia” and being a British settler colony, Australia tends to be not included in the study of Asian pop music. However Australia actually belongs to cultural geography of “Asia” for many people of Asian backgrounds live in Australia as long-standing diaspora, second & third-generation Asian Australians, recent migrants, temporary workers and overseas students who enjoy pop music of diverse parts of Asia. Furthermore, musicians, producers and industries has been collaborating with other Asian counterparts. We would welcome any paper proposal that explores the way in which Australia is part of inter-Asian pop music flows and connection. We believe that the examination of a time-space frame in terms of Australia’s involvedness in popular cultural geography of “Asia” will fruitfully expand our perspectives in the study of Asian pop music.

There have been precious precursors of Asian pop and its ilk loved and fondly remembered in a multitude of Asian countries. It could be a good starting point to explore production, circulation, consumption and impacts of these stars and hit songs in construction of Asian pop. Of course, it is far from our intention to force a contrived association between a particular sound and time-place or encourage what sounds suspiciously like a journalistic practice. We would just like to see if this change in perspective would yield any productive outcome and evaluate its potential.

Having said that, any paper that examines popular music’s contribution to construction of life (and death) of people in a particular time-place will be welcomed and much appreciated. The organizer of Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference 2016 in Melbourne would like to invite paper presenters to send their abstract (not more than 250 words) to iapmsconference@gmail.com before 15 May 2016.

Please use the Proposal Form (right click to download) when submitting your proposal. Please use your surname as file name (ex. Chua.doc, Douglas.doc). If you plan to organize a panel with more than two people, please coordinate with the panelists to put all the necessary information on one form (e.g., panel title, paper titles, individual abstracts, panelist information). A panel description is not necessary.

Please email all inquiries to: iapmsconference@gmail.com.

 

PUBLICATIONS AFTER CONFERENCE

In general, the paper submitted to the conference will be considered for publication in a special issue of a journal that organizing committee is working on. For papers that are intended for consideration for publications, we require these papers to be in one of the following streams:

1: Theory and Methodology

2: Production, Circulation and Consumption

3: Politics

4: Identity, Ideology, Affect

Besides, full paper submission is required for consideration for publication. Full and completed paper can be sent to the conference email on or before the conference dates. However, all papers will be sent for blind review, and there is no guarantee that the papers will be accepted.

 

SCHEDULE

2016.5.25 Deadline for abstract submission

2016.7.15 Acceptance of papers

2016.9.15 Registration

2016.11.15 Submission of papers

2016.12.11-12 Conference Days

REGISTRATION FEE

Committee members: AUD$ 80

Waged members: AUD$ 60

Unwaged members: AUD$ 30

Local Committee

Koichi Iwabuchi (Monash University, Australia/Japan)

Shane Homan (Monash University, Australia)…

Organizing Committee

Anthony FUNG (Chinese University, Hong Kong/China)

Jeroen Groenwegen-Lau (Independent scholar, China/Netherlands)

Tunghung HO (Fu-jen Catholic University, Taiwan)

Koichi Iwabuchi (Monash University, Australia/Japan)

Kai Khiun LIEW (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)

Jung-yup LEE (University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA/Korea)

Keewoong LEE (Sungkonghoe University, Korea)

Yoshitaka MORI (Tokyo University of the Arts, Japan)

Viriya Sawangchot (Independent scholar/ThaiPBS, Thailand)

Hyunjoon SHIN (Sungkonghoe University, Korea)

Eva TSAI (National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan)

Buni Yani (LSPR School of Communication, Phillipines/Indonesia)

ZHANG Qian (Communication University of China, China)

Notes:

English is the only language in the conference as there is no common language among Asia language. Translation service can be provided only during Q&A, in case the presenters need it.

This conference is consciously scheduled before the ACS Crossroads 2016 Conference in Sydney (14-17 December). For more information on that conference please go to: http://crossroads2016.org/call-for-papers/ and https://www.facebook.com/XR2016/.

For the updated information about submission, registration, accommodation, transportation etc, please keep visiting our website: http:www.interasiapop.org.