7th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference3-6 December – Online

Dear Participants

Hope this message finds you well


On behalf of Sunway University and the 7th IAPMS Local Arrangements Committee (LAC) we would like to express our concern as the coronavirus continues to control all matters of our lives.


Given that Malaysia is now experiencing a third wave, the 7th IAPMS conference will take place 3-6 December 2020 and will be fully online. All presentations will be delivered through asynchronous broadcasting of pre-recorded presentations followed by a live Q &A session. The conference will be done using Zoom meetings and will allow participants to ask questions during the live Q & A session.



In order to participate in the conference please register and make the payment online using the following link:

https://epayment.sunway.edu.my/suni

The fees are:

Students – RM100 (roughly 25USD)

Regular – RM200 (roughly 50USD)

(Please make sure to select the right event.)

All registered participants will receive a complimentary copy of the 7th IAPMS proceedings in either hard copy or e-book format. 

After we receive the payments, the Local Arrangements Committee will send the programme together with the Zoom links to all registered participants by November 15.  

Best regards and stay safe 


7th IAPMS Local Arrangements Committee

_________________________________

Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies 

http://interasiapop.org

https://www.facebook.com/interasiapopularmusicstudies

CfP extended: IASPm 2021

Greetings!

The Local Organizing Committee is pleased to invite you to the 21st Biennial Conference of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music to be held in Daegu, South Korea, for 5 days from July 6 to 10, 2021. Here are some latest updates on the conference.

1) Thanks to popular demands, we decided to extend deadline for abstract submission for one month until 31 August 2020. The submission can be made through the IASPM 2021 website (http://iaspm2021.org/index.php?gt=abs/abs01)

* Abstract Submission: until August 31, 2020 (Korea time GMT+8)

2) The IASPM 2021 registration fee has been set. We will deliver you with the registration guide when the payment system is completed.

3) We are delighted to introduce you Keynote Speakers for IASPM 2021:

– Britta Sweers (Director of the Center for Global Studies at the University of Bern, Switzerland)

– Shuhei Hosokawa (Professor Emeritus at the International Research Center for Japanese Studies)

– Chan E. Park (Professor, Ohio State University, United States)

– Jung-Sun Lee (Singer-songwriter, Guitarist, and former professor of Seoul Arts University, Korea)

4) IASPM 2021will proceed as announced in spite of the uncertainty caused by COVID-19

Despite the on-going worldwide crisis of COVID-19, the local organizing committee is working hard to make IASPM 2021 in Daegu happen. Depending on the situation in 2021, the conference could take the form of real, virtual, or hybrid. We are preparing for every possible scenario to ensure IASPM 2021 to be a successful conference. IASPM 2021 will be greatly benefitted from host city Daegu’s world-class capacity for COVID-19 control. In close cooperation with Daegu Metropolitan City, we will make sure a safe and sound conference experience for all participants. Thank you!

For further details, please visit IASPM 2021 website at http://iaspm2021.org/index.php.
Best,IASPM 2021 Local Organising Committee

[CfP] XXI Biennial IASPM Conference in Daegu, South Korea

“Climates of Popular Music”, 21st Biennial Conference of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music
Call for Presentations
The most pressing issue for humanity in the 21st century is global climate, and thus IASPM’s 21st Conference turns its attention towards this subject. Whereas our 20th anniversary conference considered where we have been, we now ask where we are now, what we are doing as a species, and what impact it has on our communities and our world. On a planet increasingly interconnected by a dizzying array of media channels, such a discussion has to be broadly framed. Our planet’s climate is impacted by numerous forms of human activity, including those that are individual, personal, local, communal, institutional, commercial, corporate, cultural, political, and international. This conference invites presentations that ask how popular music relates to our climate, where climate relates to any part of the totality of surrounding conditions and circumstances affecting growth or development. By “climate,” we intend to include a range of definitions, including ecological climate, political climates, socio-political climates, and contextual and individuated climates. We ask presenters to consider the impacts of activities related to popular music and its cultures on variously defined climates, and the impacts of changing or changed climates on different popular music and its contexts.
To address these issues, as well as any other questions and topics related to the past, present and future climates of popular music, the International Association for the Study of Popular Music invites proposals for the twenty-first IASPM biennial conference, to be held at Kyungpook National University in Daegu, South Korea, July 6-10, 2021. The general theme of conference is divided into five interrelated streams:
A) Environment
Popular music has long been associated with green agendas, ecological concerns, and environmental activism, and this stream takes a more literal interpretation of the conference title than others. It also implies a link to ecological approaches that explore affordances as well as impacts, including insights from fields such as eco-musicology and ethnomusicology.
B) Milieu
Political climates no doubt seem to be more complex than those of the past to each generation. They have a direct influence on the stability and sustainability of our cultures, and this relationship is often reflected in our popular music. Political storms, quakes and disasters flow from isolationism into global cooperation, between east and west and from south to north. This stream will address local, national, and international politics, as well as individuated socio-politics, as reflected through issues such as identity, gender, class, sexuality, and belief, and seen and heard through popular music.
C) Ambiance
When describing climates, we may use terms such as ambiance, atmosphere, mood, or tone, to conceptualize the often unconscious perceptions of space and place. Studies of space and place have emerged as a key interdisciplinary subject across numerous fields and have crossed into popular music studies through studies of geographies, locality, scenes and subcultures. This stream invites explorations of receptions and perceptions, of audiences and ethnographies, of set and settings of popular music.
D) World
Climate, however defined, is intimately associated with questions that require a global approach. Although ‘world music’ has slowly made peace with ethnomusicology and although both have made inroads into popular music studies, they have not yet reached a truly global understanding of popular music. Areas such as South East Asia, where this conference is to be hosted, are having an increasing impact upon popular music, yet they are significantly under-represented. This stream encourages contributions which widen and deepen our global/local understanding of popular music and its cultures, whether through a detailed study of a specific subculture or scene, or by exploring changes in global popular music climates.
E) Mediums
The modes and channels of mediation of music have evolved at a rapid rate over the last 120 years, moving through cycles of oral, written, recorded, digital, and virtual transmission, into a multi-valent universe where revivals of folk singing and vinyl clubs mix with digital music and streaming. This stream focuses on how mediums impact on popular music, and on the role of technology.
Academic Committee
Geoff Stahl (co-chair), Andrea Dankić (co-chair). Pil Ho Kim (co-chair)
Local Organizing Committee
Keewoong Lee (chair), Aekyung Park, Eunice Sung, Taeyoon Kim, Hyun Kyong Chang, Eujeong Zhang, Hyunjoon Shin, Hyunseok Kwon, Gyu Tag Lee, Hawsook Song, Wonseok Lee, Pil Ho Kim, Jun-Hue Lee, Jung-Yup Lee, Jungwon Kim, Yu Jung Lee, Youngdae Kim
* Individual roles not yet assigned
Abstracts
There will be four options: panels (of 3 or 4 presenters), individual papers, film/video presentations, or poster sessions.
Panels
Proposals for organized panels are encouraged (two-hour long sessions with four papers, or three papers and a discussant). Each session should leave at least 30 minutes for discussion or for comments by a discussant immediately following the presentations. The panel organizer should submit the panel abstract and all individual abstracts (200 words each) in one document, with a full list of participant names and email addresses. Where an independently submitted abstract appears to fit a panel, the Academic Committee may suggest the addition of a panelist.
Papers
We invite abstracts of no longer than 200 words, including five keywords for programming purposes and an optional list of references (max 10). Individual paper presentations are 20 minutes long to be followed by 10 minutes of discussion.
Film/video session
Recently completed films introduced by their author and discussed by conference participants may be proposed. Submit a 200-word abstract including titles, subjects, and formats, and indicate the duration of the proposed films/videos and introduction/discussion.
Poster session
A space for Poster Exhibition will be provided. A 200-word abstract by the poster’s author, including five keywords for programming purposes, must be submitted.
Submission
Please submit your abstract no later than 31 July 2020, as both doc. & pdf. format attachment through the IASPM 2021 official website. You can easily find detailed guidelines and templates at the online submission page.
  • * Each participant must be a member of any branch of IASPM: www.iaspm.net/how-to-join.
  • * Each participant may present only one paper at the Conference, but may also preside over a panel or serve as a discussant.
  • * Abstracts will be accepted in English, IASPM’s official language.
  • * Letters of acceptance will be sent by 30 September 2020.
If you have any question, feel free to contact IASPM 2021 Secretariat (iaspm2021@gmail.com)
Covid 19 Information
We are aware of the global pandemic’s impact across the world and take issues of safety seriously. We hope that by the time of the conference, various COVID19-related restrictions will have eased more or less completely. We are monitoring the situation closely and will advise members accordingly.
Virtual Presentations
We are aware of the environmental impact of global travel, especially in light of the subject of the conference. We hope that moving some of the conference online will be one way of addressing this ecological issue. Circumstances surrounding the current pandemic have also made virtual research sharing more necessary. We are preparing so that at least some portions of the conference can take place online and interested parties may be able to attend the conference virtually. More information will be published when it is available.
The conference organizers look forward to receiving your submissions!
With kindest regards,
IASPM Executive Committee:
  • Rupert Till, Chair
  • Beatriz Goubert, Secretary
  • Bernhard Steinbrecher, Membership Secretary
  • Simone Krueger Bridge, Treasurer
  • Kimi Kärki, Webmaster
  • Keewoong Lee, Conference Chair
  • Catherine Strong, Member-at-large
  • Andrea Dankić, Member-at-large

Made in Taiwan: Studies in Popular Music, 1st Edition

Made in Taiwan: Studies in Popular Music, is officially published by Routledge early this year. It is edited by me, Tung-hung, and Miaoju. Please recommend your institution/library to purchase a copy.

https://www.routledge.com/Made-in-Taiwan-Studies-in-Popular-Music-1st-Edition/Tsai-Ho-Jian/p/book/9780815360179

We hope the book will contribute to further dialogues. 
Also, last week, Taiwan Insight published six short articles about the book. Three of the articles by the contributors of the book, and the other, by other academic or industry insiders/observers. Maybe this will pique your curiosity. Please follow the links.

(1) https://taiwaninsight.org/2020/02/06/taiwanese-popular-music-as-world-history/ 

(2) https://taiwaninsight.org/2020/02/07/unpacking-indie-music-as-cool-ambassadors-reflections-on-taiwans-cultural-export-policies-2010-present/

(3) https://taiwaninsight.org/2020/02/10/the-academic-rappers-of-the-taiwanese-hip-hop-scene/

(4) https://taiwaninsight.org/2020/02/11/breakthrough-the-thinking-of-indigenous-music-as-a-style-of-music/

(5) https://taiwaninsight.org/2020/02/12/city-pop-in-taiwan-old-mainstreams-becoming-new-indies/

(6) https://taiwaninsight.org/2020/02/13/jay-chous-china-wind-pop-made-in-taiwan-and-its-transnational-audiences/

Sincerely,

Eva Tsai

The 7th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies (IAPMS) Conference Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 23-25 July, 2020

*** Dec 15, 2019: The deadline for the submission is extended to Jan 15, 2020. 

The 7th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies (IAPMS) Conference Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

23-25 July, 2020

Organised by Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Group (IAPMS Group)

Hosted by

Sunway University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Abstract Submissions Deadline

15 December 2019

Theme: Asia’s Sonic (under)Currents and Currencies

The recent international popularity of Korean pop groups BTS and Blackpink placed Asia from passive recipients to active participants of otherwise US and UK dominated global pop music. However, the extent in which they represent and personify the rich undercurrent of popular music circulation in Asia remains debatable in Asia’s culturally diverse landscapes. While the digital platform and social media as well as travel have intensified the flows of popular music participation, it is probably premature to idealistically suggest the levelling of more enduring historical and cultural boundaries and borders. The post•global or post•digital condition needs discussion.

In this respect, the theme of this conference, “Sonic (under)Currents and Currencies” seeks to explore the responses of popular music as local, trans•local national and transnational formations and traditions to the disruptions and changes in the region’s changing techno•cultural landscape. Within such disruptions, the conference also explores the relevance and currencies of both assumptions and practices of popular music in the region. Examples range from genres and categories, cultural industries, politics and government, fandom and activism to name a few.

Since its first conference in 2008, the IAPMS has encouraged a diversity of scholarship at all levels about popular music studies in the context of Asia. The conference welcomes presentations from the academic community as well as practitioners, activists and policymakers. As the 7th conference will be held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, the organising committee hopes to see greater representation of topics and presenters from ASEAN countries.

Tentative Schedule

22nd July 2020 – Arrival to Kuala Lumpur 23rd July 2020  – Registration, opening, conference begins

24th July 2020  – Conference sessions, concert 25th July 2020  – Conference sessions, closing ceremony

26th July 2020  – Excursion

Local arrangements information will be provided in early 2020 and sent to all participants via email.

Please submit an abstract (200-300 words) and short bio (max. 100 words) by 15th December 2019 to iapmsconference@gmail.com . For panels, please submit a general panel description of 200-300 words, along with three or four abstracts (200-300 words each) and biographies (max. 100 words each). Please use the form (download).

Notice of acceptance will be given by 1 February 2020

Registration Fee

Students:         RM100

Non Students:  RM200

Language

English, Bahasa Melayu

English is the official language of this symposium, however, presenters may choose to deliver their papers in Bahasa Melayu with English language Powerpoint presentation. However, all abstracts are to be submitted in English for review and selection purposes.

Publication

-­­  All presentations will be published in the IAPMS conference proceedings sponsored by Sunway University.

With the acceptance of your proposal by the Program Committee and the presentation of your paper at the conference, it is understood that your paper (in a revised and prepared version by you the author) will be included in the Proceedings of the Symposium published by Sunway University Press.

Program Committee

Chair            Kai Khiun Liew (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)

Members      Miaoju Jian (National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan)

                     Vicky Ho (The Open University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong)

                     Qian Zhang (Communication University of China, China)

                     Atchareeya Saisin (Chiang Mai University, Thailand)

                     Jungwon Kim (Yonsei University, Korea)

                     Fushiki Kaori (Taisho University, Japan)

                     Kyohei Miyairi (Independent Scholar, Japan)

                     Mayco Santaella (Sunway University, Malaysia)

                     Isabella Pek (SEAMEX Institute)

Local Arrangements Committee

Chair             Mayco Santaella (Sunway University, Malaysia)

Members       Azmyl Yusof (Sunway University, Malaysia)

                      Adil Johan (National University of Malaysia)

                      Christine Yong (Sunway University, Malaysia)

                      Rachel Ong (Sunway University, Malaysia)

                      Frank Ong (Sunway University, Malaysia)

                      Isabella Pek (SEAMEX Institute)

Webmaster

Hyunjoon Shin (Sungkonghoe University, Korea)

Jungyup Lee (University of Massachusetts, Amherst, US/Korea)

cfp: XX Biennial IASPM Conference (Canberra, Australia, 24-28 June, 2019)

Turns and Revolutions in Popular Music Studies

XX Biennial IASPM Conference
School of Music, The Australian National University
Canberra, Australia, 24–28 June 2019

Call for Presentations

As certain songsters and songstresses have noted, seasons turn, turn, turn, even if you are talking about a revolution. While global warming alters seasonal cycles with the aid of neoliberal and (pseudo)socialist forms of capitalism, and waves of societal turmoil follow each other with varying degrees of authoritarianism in different parts of the world, popular music studies remains committed to critical enquiry of music of the masses, the everyday, a variety of subcultures, the megastars, all with their revolutionary potential. Faced with the increasing worldwide austerity in the humanities and social sciences, caused by short-sighted research funding policies that purportedly aim at revolutionary technological and business innovations, popular music studies also struggles with its future directions. Whither popular music studies and where to turn?

Popular music studies in its institutional form is approaching the end of its youthful years, and IASPM will celebrate its twentieth biennial conference in Canberra. This provides also an opportunity to turn to the past and reconsider what may be learned from the twists and shouts of the previous decades. How have recent affective, neomaterialist, performative, post-humanist, spatial, transnational and visual turns, among others, affected popular music studies, and what might the emergent or future disciplinary turns be? Or to what extent do the turns and revolutions within popular music studies signal an excessive neoliberal belief in constant innovation that implies a lack of thorough investigation of the field’s intellectual history? How are the politics of higher education changing the field’s history of critical research and challenging its civic agenda?

To address these issues, as well as any other questions and topics related to the past, present and future turns and revolutions of popular music studies, the International Association for the Study of Popular Music invites proposals for the twentieth biennial conference, to be held at the School of Music at the Australian National University in Canberra 24–28 June 2019. The general theme of the conference is divided into six interrelated streams:

a) Temporal turns and revolutions. In recent years there has been a pronounced interest in popular music as cultural heritage. Alongside issues of heritagisation, this stream accommodates topics relating to nostalgia, history, historiography and futurology alike, and any other aspect involving temporal relations within popular music studies.

b) Spatial turns and revolutions. As popular music studies is a global field of enquiry, debates emerge concerning the key geographical loci of its knowledge production. This stream welcomes discussion on the centrality of Western conceptualisations of popular music and their challenges, including the variety of centre–periphery relations, “locals” versus “newcomers”, migration and displacement. Furthermore, how are issues of space and place dealt with in the field, including such liminal circumstances as festivals?

c) Technological turns and revolutions. Media studies approaches constitute a dominant strand of popular music studies, and in addition to issues of media, mediation, mediatisation, et cetera, this stream invites topics that address all dimensions of popular music and technology, whether conceived as practical technical solutions or more abstract logic behind the use of various tools and techniques. A particularly relevant theme in this stream is the presence of technological elements in all stages of the music industry, from production to consumption, and how they blur the lines between live, recorded and streamed music experiences. Additionally, how is technology inspiring aesthetic choices, also in terms of post-digital backlash?

d) Political turns and revolutions. Popular music studies, however defined, is intimately associated with questions of power relations and hence with politics. In an age of global migration, extremist populism, global warming and #metoo, the politics of popular music are implicated in issues of racism, ecological activism and gender and sexual discrimination in particular. Presentations focussing on identity, intersectionality, and more generally, inclusivity are especially welcome, as well as those that address the socio-historical shifts in protest music, however conceived.

e) Theoretical turns and revolutions. How has the inherent interdisciplinary nature of the field evolved during the last decades? How have “popular” and “music” been – and continue to be – understood in the field, and how is their “study” or “analysis” conceived? Furthermore, how are the theoretical and methodological choices that popular music scholars make today likely to affect the field’s “health and wellbeing” in the future? Of particular relevance here are topics that deal with conceptual curves and conflicts within popular music studies, whether stemming from feminism, Marxism, postcolonialism, semiotics, music analysis, or any strand of music theory in its broadest sense.

f) Affective turns and revolutions. Issues of feeling, emotion and pleasure have been central in the study of popular music, in part because of the importance granted to forms of stardom and fandom. Alongside such questions, this stream tackles additional aspects of affective attunements and alliances within popular music and its scholarly investigation.

Academic Committee

Pablo Alabarces, Emilia Barna, Sam de Boise, Giacomo Bottà, Diego García Peinazo, Elsa Grassy, Florian Heesch, Sarah Hill, Fabian Holt, Nadine Hubbs, Laura Jordán González, Akitsugu Kawamoto, Pil Ho Kim, Serge Lacasse, Kristin McGee, Isabella Pek, Rosa Reitsamer (co-chair), Geoff Stahl (co-chair).

Local Organising Committee

Samantha Bennett (chair), Catherine Hoad, Di Hughes, Stephen Loy, Bonnie McConnell, Pat O’Grady, Georgia Pike, Julie Rickwood, Geoff Stahl, Catherine Strong, Aleisha Ward, Samuel Whiting, Kirsten Zemke.

Abstracts

There will be four options: panels (of 3 or 4 presenters), individual papers, film/video presentations, or poster sessions. Panels and individual papers may also be delivered as practice-based presentations, featuring performance-based, composition-based, recording-based or multimedia-based research. In case of practice-based presentations, please make sure to include a description of room and/or technical requirements. In addition, online presentations may be considered for inclusion in the programme, yet priority is given to on-site participation.

Panels

Proposals of organized panels are strongly recommended (two-hour long sessions with four papers, or three papers and a discussant). Each session should leave at least 30 minutes for discussion or for comments by a discussant immediately following the presentations. The panel organizer should submit the panel abstract and all individual abstracts (200 words each) in one document, with a full list of participant names and email addresses. Where an independently submitted abstract appears to fit a panel, the Academic Committee may suggest the addition of a panellist.

Papers

We invite abstracts of no longer than 200 words, including five keywords for programming purposes and an optional list of references (max 10). Individual paper presentations are 20 minutes long to be followed by 10 minutes of discussion.

Film/video session

Recently completed films introduced by their author and discussed by conference participants may be proposed. Submit a 200-word abstract including titles, subjects, and formats, and indicate the duration of the proposed films/videos and introduction/discussion.

Poster session

A space where presenters can exhibit posters will be provided. A 200-word abstract by the poster’s author, including five keywords for programming purposes, must be submitted.

Submission

Please email your abstract no later than 31 July 2018, as a doc/odt/rtf attachment to iaspm2019@anu.edu.au. Please name the file with your surname (eg. Ciccone.docx). The following format should be used:

• Name, affiliation and contact email address
• Type of presentation (select one from: panel, individual paper, film/video, poster)
• Stream (select preferably one but not more than two from: Temporal/Spatial/Technological/Political/Theoretical/Affective Turns and Revolutions)
• Title of presentation
• Abstract (200 words maximum; in the case of panels, include a general abstract followed by individual abstracts, in total 1000 words maximum)
• Five keywords
• Bio (80 words maximum; in case of panels, bios of all participants)

Abstracts will be accepted in English, IASPM’s official language. Papers in all other languages are allowed, if accompanied by a visual presentation in English. Letters of acceptance will be sent by 30 September 2018.

Each participant must be a member of IASPM: http://www.iaspm.net/how-to-join. Each participant may present only one paper at the Conference, but may also preside over a panel or serve as a discussant.

The conference organisers look forward to receiving your submissions!

With kindest regards

IASPM Executive Committee:
Julio Mendivil, Chair
Jacopo Conti
Marta García Quiñones
Antti-Ville Kärjä
Kimi Kärki
Sílvia Martínez
Ann Werner

Call for Proposals: IASPM-SEA Conference 2019

Call for Proposals: IASPM-SEA Conference 2019

‘Popular x Traditional’

11-13 January 2019, RUANG Think City, Kuala Lumpur

Deadline for abstracts: 31 August 2018

The IASPM-SEA Conference (IASPM-SEA 2019), hosted by RUANG Think City, will take place on Friday 11th to Sunday 13th January 2019 at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. This international conference will feature research and performances about the interaction, convergence and contestation of popular music with traditional music in Southeast Asia. We also welcome proposals of / from / on any region that relate to the conference theme or subthemes.

Aside from aesthetic approaches that merge local traditions with global popular music styles, the conference also seeks to question the notion of the popular in relation to the traditional. It is often overlooked that currently considered traditional musics were once popular art forms, either practiced communally (in sites of worship, villages, homes, ritual festivities) or consumed commercially (in records, films, cassettes, concert halls). However, postcolonial states in the region continually seek to construct and perpetuate a primordial expression of national identity, sourced in invented traditions that have resulted in homogenous boundaries of musical culture. In truth, the popular is in constant dialogue with the traditional, as musical practices and styles adapt and change in a process mediated by human actors in ever-changing historical, political, social and cultural contexts.

Thus, the theme of ‘Popular x Traditional’ invites participants to think beyond such the oppositional divide between the two terms in music practice and scholarship, drawing attention to the fluid interchanges and continual adaptations of music-making in the context of distinct national, ethnic and cultural identities expressed in an increasingly commodified and digitally-mediated world.

Keynote speakers

– To be announced

Conference Themes

– Popular x Traditional

– Local x Global

– Art x Commercial

– Performance x Production

– Analog x Digital

– Independent x Mainstream

– Religious x Secular

Proposal categories
– Papers (20 minutes maximum, with 10 minutes for discussion)
– Paper sessions (three or four papers, each of 20 minutes maximum, with 10 minutes per paper for discussion)
– Roundtable discussions (up to 6 participants, each giving a short position paper, followed by a general discussion, total running time of 90 or 120 minutes)
– Recitals, lecture-recitals and lectures illustrated by sound diffusions or audio-visual screenings (maximum duration 90 minutes)

Proposal guidelines
– For individual papers: up to 250 words
– For paper sessions: 250-word (maximum) summary and up to 200 words for each session participant
– For roundtable discussions: 250-word (maximum) and up to 150 words for each panel participant
– For recitals, lecture-recitals and lectures illustrated by sound diffusions or audio-visual screenings: 250 word (maximum) summary, plus participant CVs and recordings / scores / other details of works to be included in the event (contact the organizing committee to discuss)

Further information for applicants
– Proposals must be sent by email as a MS Word or PDF attachment to iaspm.sea@gmail.com.
– Proposals need not be anonymised.
– All enquiries should be sent to Ken-Ny via iaspm.sea@gmail.com.

Programme committee:

Adil Johan (UKM, Malaysia)

Citra Aryandari (ISI Yogyakarta, Indonesia)

Raja Iskandar Halid (UMK, Malaysia)

Liew Kai Khiun (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)

Viriya Sawangchot (Inter-Asia School, Thailand)

Sarah Hill (Cardiff University, UK)

Proposal submission deadline:

31 August 2018.

Applicants will be notified by 30 September 2018.

Conference Travel Information

Visa
The type of visa will depend on the nationality of the visitor. When you search for visa, please visit the official Australian government website https://www.border.gov.au/. All the information that a legitimate visitor to Australia can be found there.
Note: Please don’t go through the various visa finder websites that often ask for money (beyond the normal visas processing fees (if they apply), ask for endless documentation (an issue in itself) and hold up the process.

Transportation
It is recommended to buy a Myki card to use for trains, trams and buses: https://www.ptv.vic.gov.au/tickets/myki. The quickest and cheapest way to get Caulfield campus from the city is by a 15 minute train ride. About the journey planner, you can check at http://www.metrotrains.com.au/.

Accommodation
Below is a short list of budget hotels between the City and Caulfield campus. There are more options in the City, and you can check at the websites such as hostelbookers.com and hostelworld.com.

Punthill South Yarra
Located near South Yarra train station
Price: Approx $100 per night
Website: http://www.punthill.com.au/specials-and-packages/melbourne-specials/

Adina Apartment Hotel South Yarra
52 Darling St South Yarra, VIC 3141 Australia – short walk to the South Yarra train station – can catch Frankston/ Pakenham/ Cranbourne/ Dandenong train to Caulfield.
Price: Approx $107 per night, otherwise approx. $150 (if booked 45 days prior to stay)
website: https://www.tfehotels.com/brands/adina-apartment-hotels?_ga=1.221911000.1397185684.1475624100

Ibis Styles Melbourne, The Victoria Hotel
Location: 214 Little Collins St, Melbourne. – take train on the Frankston/ Pakenham/ Dandenong or Cranbourne lines to Caulfield.
Price: Approx $100 per night
website: https://www.victoriahotel.com.au/book-now/

Bayview on the park
Location: 42 Queens Road, Melbourne – short walk to tram stop (Tram route 3), that takes you straight to Caulfield Campus, Monash University.
Price: Approx $90 – $125 per night
website: https://book.revato.com/grid?Propertyid=4064&checkin=2016-12-11&checkout=2016-12-12&source=GOO&Label=546193028&roomid=(ROOMID)&languageCode=EN&clientCountryCode=US&currencyCode=AUD

Carnegie Motor Inn
Location: 1102 Dandenong Road, Carnegie – 10 minute walk to Carnegie Station and then catch train to Caulfield or a 20 minute walk.
Price: Approx $130 per night
Website: http://www.carnegiemotorinn.com.au/