[Book Review] Made in Korea: Studies in Popular Music – Motti Regev

http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/D4DksXuHKZkJ8PHRdfX9/full

Book Review

Made in Korea: Studies in Popular Music

Pages 1-2 | Published online: 10 Jul 2017

A fine addition to the highly recommended series Global Popular Music (edited by Franco Fabbri and Goffredo Plastino), this volume on popular music in Korea (short for South Korea) is as comprehensive as such a book can be. Its sixteen thematic chapters are divided into four sections, devoted to histories, genres, artists, and socio-cultural issues. These are preceded by a short introduction, outlining some basic information about Korean history, aspects of language, and transcription. The book is rounded up by a chapter on the circulation of Korean pop in Asia, and (a permanent feature in the series) a conversation with a prominent musician. In this case it is the late Shin Hae-chul (1968–2014), a major figure in Korean pop-rock music of the 1990s.

Admittedly, I am not an expert on Korean music or culture. For my own work on the globalization of pop-rock music (see Regev) I have consulted several available texts in English (notably Epstein; Howard; Shin; Kim and Shin) that provided intriguing introductions to the complexity and richness of the field of pop-rock in this country. This new book goes several steps further in offering a multifaceted view of major themes and issues in Korean popular music. Three key topics seem to be at the core of any interest in Korean pop-rock. These are the stylistic and socio-cultural evolution of pop-rock music in Korea, and especially its relation to local indigenous traditions; the social and political context of pop-rock music production and consumption, amid the prominent American presence in the country or the authoritarian regimes that were in power until the 1990s; and the phenomenon of K-Pop that swept young people in East Asia and other parts of the world at the turn of the twenty-first century.

Indeed, audiences in other parts of the world became aware of Korean popular music mostly in the wake of K-pop. This major phenomenon is covered here in two chapters. One (by Sun Jung) illuminates the deliberate production of the “wave” as an export project by the cultural industries of Korea, and especially their conscious use of social media. The other (by Dong-Yeun Lee) examines the meaning and role of idols in the context of K-Pop. Combining pop tunes and glamorous images of youth, these cultural products with short life spans are interpreted here as typical of the neo-liberal market.

K-pop and idol culture are, however, but one relatively recent phase in the history of Korean pop-rock. As the thread that runs through this book makes clear, it is a history characterized by a quest for a balance between Western, mostly Anglo-American influences, and traditional or indigenous sounds. Strictly local genres attempt to preserve a musical language of supposedly pure “Korean-ness.” These obviously include folk music and People’s Song (both discussed here in a chapter by Aekyung Park), but also Trot and Ballad, explained and described in a chapter by Yu-Jeong Chang.

Several chapters in the book add up to present a broad picture of the stylistic evolution of pop-rock in Korea, including explorations of typical Korean sounds and the intricate ways in which this has been entangled with changing attitudes of the regime towards popular music. A chapter by Jung-Yup Lee in the History section follows the change in media broadcasting of music from being a state and politically controlled institution to a highly commercialized and diverse mechanism in the 1990s and 2000s. Soojin Kim, in her chapter in the Issues section, completes this aspect by surveying the ambivalence towards popular music in the cultural policies of the regimes through the years.

Chapters in the Artists section fill this institutional context with examinations of three towering figures in the history of Korean pop-rock. Dohee Kwon focuses on Shin Joong Hyun, one of the most influential and prominent rock musicians in the country, and especially on one of his most famous works, “Miin” (1974); Okon Hwang outlines the career of composer and singer Kim Min-ki, whose song “Ach’imisŭl” became an anthem for the anti-dictatorship movement of the 1970s; and Eun-Young Jung discusses the impact of Seo Taiji, whose career was pivotal in introducing hip hop, dance, metal and hard rock to the mainstream of Korean popular music. Additionally, an interesting chapter by Haekyung Um in the Issues section examines changes in the vocal style of Korean singers along history and across styles, and points to the cultural shifts reflected in them.

A review of the stylistic scope and genealogy of Korean pop-rock is provided by Pil Ho Kim in the Genres section. His chapter traces the path of Korean rock from the early Group Sound phenomenon of the 1960s and early 1970s to the most recent indie and alternative bands of the 2000s. His observation about the relation of twenty-first-century indie rockers, who “managed to bring back the old formula of global-local balance with a new twist,” to the history of Korean popular music seems to capture the cultural essence of the story unfolded in this book. He writes, “For example, 3rd Line Butterfly resurrects Kim Hae-song, the jazz genius during the 1930-1940s, by sampling his music in “Kimp”o ssangna’al’ (Double Horn of Kimp’o, 2004). Chang Ki-ha Wa Ŏlgul Tŭl (Chang Kiha and the Faces) . . . makes clever references to Group Sound rock and modern folk of the 1970s.” Kim concludes that “Korean popular music has been around long enough to establish a tradition of its own and to help create new local sound that may well be added to the global repertoire of rock music” (all quotations 80).

Regretfully, language and other cultural aspects hinder fans in other countries from getting acquainted with and enjoying the full range of pop-rock music from Korea. At the scholarly level, however, this book provides an expansive overview, written by an expert team of researchers. This book is certainly not just for scholars of Korean or Asian culture. I think that researchers in popular music, cultural studies, media, and cultural sociology who are interested in the details and intricacies of cultural globalization can find a wealth of information and insights hidden in these pages.

Motti Regev
The Open University of Israel

© 2017 Motti Regev
https://doi.org/10.1080/03007766.2017.1348594

Works Cited

  • Epstein, Stephen J. “Anarchy in the UK, Solidarity in the ROK: Punk Rock Comes to Korea.” Acta Koreana 3 (2000): 134. Print.
  • Howard, Keith, ed. Korean Pop Music: Riding the WaveFolkestoneGlobal Oriental2006. Print.
  • Kim, Pil Ho, and Hyunjoon Shin. “The Birth of ‘Rok’: Cultural Imperialism, Nationalism, and the Glocalization of Rock Music in South Korea, 1964–1975.” Positions 18 (2010): 199230. Print.

     

  • Regev, MottiPop-Rock Music: Aesthetic Cosmopolitanism in Late ModernityCambridgePolity2013. Print.
  • Shin, Hyunjoon. “The Success of Hopelessness: The Evolution of Korean Indie Music.” Perfect Beat 12 (2011): 147165. Print.

Vamping the Stage: Female Voices of Asian Modernities – Edited by Andrew N. Weintraub and Bart Barendregt

Vamping the Stage: Female Voices of Asian Modernities

Discussion published by Andrew Weintraub on Wednesday, July 26, 2017
I would like to announce the publication of Vamping the Stage: Female Voices of Asian Modernities, the first book-length study of women, modernity, and popular music in Asia (University of Hawai’i Press, 2017). Consisting of a lengthy introduction and 14 case studies, this edited volume demonstrates how female performers supported, challenged, and transgressed gendered norms in the entertainment industries of China, Japan, India, Indonesia, Iran, Korea, Malaysia, and the Philippines. Placing women’s voices in social and historical contexts, the authors explore salient discourses, representations, meanings, and politics of “voice” in Asian popular music.  Female performers were not merely symbols of times that were rapidly changing. Nor were they simply the personification of global historical changes. Female entertainers, positioned at the margins of intersecting fields of activities, created something hitherto unknown: they were artistic pioneers of new music, new cinema, new forms of dance and theater, and new behavior, lifestyles, and morals. They were active agents in the creation of local performance cultures, of a newly emerging mass culture, and the rise of a region-wide and globally oriented entertainment industry.
Edited by Andrew N. Weintraub and Bart Barendregt
Table of Contents

CHAPTER 1

Re-Vamping Asia: Women, Music, and Modernity in Comparative Perspective

Andrew N. Weintraub and Bart Barendregt

PART I

Triumph and Tragedies of the Colonized Voice: Colonial Modernity, Commodification,
and Circulation of Women’s Voices

CHAPTER 2

Acoustic Ladies: Mediating Audiovisual Modernity in Early German and Chinese Talkies

Yiman Wang

CHAPTER 3

On Becoming Nora: Transforming the Voice and Place of the Sing-Song Girl through Zhou Xuan

Yifen Beus

CHAPTER 4

Malay Women Singers of Colonial Malaya: Voicing Alternative Gender Identity and Modernity

Tan Sooi Beng

CHAPTER 5

The “Comfort Women” and the Voices of East Asian Modernity

Joshua D. Pilzer

PART II

Modern Stars and Modern Lives: Nation, Memory, and the Politics of Gender

CHAPTER 6

Diva Misora Hibari as Spectacle of Postwar Japan’s Modernity

Christine R. Yano

CHAPTER 7

Titiek Puspa: Gendered Modernity in 1960s and 1970s Indonesian Popular Music

Andrew N. Weintraub

CHAPTER 8

The Remarkable Career of L. R. Eswari

Amanda Weidman

PART III

Silenced Voices and Forbidden Modernities: Censorship, Morality, and National Identity

CHAPTER 9

Gendered and Censored Modernity: Two Female Singers and Their Music in South Korea

Soojin Kim

CHAPTER 10

Princess Siti and the Particularities of Post-Islamist Pop

Bart Barendregt

CHAPTER 11

Googoosh’s Voice: An Iranian Icon in Silence and Song

Farzaneh Hemmasi

PART IV

Body Politics and Discourses of Femininity: Image, Sexuality, and the Body

CHAPTER 12

Enacting Modernity through Voice, Body, and Gender: Filipina Singers from the Close of the Philippine-American War to the Onset of Martial Law (1913–1972)

Ricardo D. Trimillos

CHAPTER 13

Beyond Black and Gray: Portraits and Scenes of Javanese Singer Waldjinah in Indonesian Popular Print Media

Russell P. Skelchy

CHAPTER 14

Mainstreaming Dance Music and Articulating Femininity: South Korean Dance Divas in the 1980s

Hee-sun Kim

CHAPTER 15

The Ideal Idol: Making Music with Hatsune Miku, the “First Sound of the Future” 320

Jennifer Milioto Matsue

For further information:

http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/p-9840-9780824869861.aspx

ISBN: 978-0-8248-6986-1

372 pp.

“From Handover to Leftover: Tatming, Umbrellas, and the Postcolonial Ruins of Hong Kong”, Situations [10.1 (2017): 119–145] – Leonie Schmidt, Yiu Fai Chow, and Jeroen de Kloet

Leonie Schmidt, Yiu Fai Chow, and Jeroen de Kloet ,From Handover to Leftover: Tatming, Umbrellas, and the Postcolonial Ruins of Hong Kong, Situations [10.1 (2017): 119–145].

Downloadable at:

http://chinacreative.humanities.uva.nl/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/From-Handover-to-Leftover_Tatming-Umbrellas-and-the-Postcolonial-Ruins-of-Hong-Kong.pdf

https://www.academia.edu/32111871/From_Handover_to_Leftover_Tatming_Umbrellas_and_the_Postcolonial_Ruins_of_Hong_Kong_by_Leonie_Schmidt_Chow_Yiu_Fai_and_Jeroen_de_Kloet?auto=download

 

Routledge Handbook of East Asian Popular Culture – Edited by Koichi Iwabuchi, Eva Tsai, Chris Berry

Routledge Handbook of East Asian Popular Culture (Hardback) book cover

Since the 1990s there has been a dramatic increase in cultural flows and connections between the countries in the East Asian region. Nowhere is this more apparent than when looking at popular culture where uneven but multilateral exchanges of Japanese, Korean, Taiwanese, Hong Kong and Chinese products have led to the construction of an ‘East Asian Popular Culture’. This is both influenced by, and in turn influences, the national cultures, and generates transnational co-production and reinvention.

As East Asian popular culture becomes a global force, it is increasingly important for us to understand the characteristics of contemporary East Asian popular culture, and in particular its transnational nature. In this handbook, the contributors theorize East Asian experiences and reconsider Western theories on cultural globalization to provide a cutting-edge overview of this global phenomenon.

The Routledge Handbook of East Asian Popular Culture will be of great interest to students and scholars of a wide range of disciplines, including: Cultural Studies, Media Studies, Communication Studies, Anthropology, Sociology and Asian Studies in general.

Table of Contents

Introduction: Critical approaches to East Asian pop culture, Koichi Iwabuchi, Eva Tsai, and Chris Berry

Part I: Historicization and Spatialization of East Asian pop culture

1. Historicizing East Asian Pop Culture, Younghan CHO

2. East Asian popular culture and inter-Asian referencing, Koichi IWABUCHI

3. Hybridity, Korean Wave and Asian Media, Doobo SHIM

4. Been informal and formal cultural economy: Chinese subtitle groups and flexible accumulation in the age of online viewing, Kelly HU

5. Digital Diaspora, Mobility and HomeYouna KIM

Part II: The development of national production and its regional circulation/connection

6. Films

6a. Ways of S. Korean Cinema: Phantom, Trans –Cinema and Korean BlockbustersSoyoung KIM

6b. Welcome to Chollywood: Chinese Language Cinema as a Transborder Assemblage, Chris Berry

6c. Globalism, New Media, and Cinematically Imagining the Inescapable Japan, Aaron Gerow

7. TV dramas

7a. Bordercrossing, Local Modification and Transnational Transaction of TV Dramas in East Asia, Anthony FUNG

7b. Confucian Heroes in Popular Asian Dramas in the Age of Capitalism, Hsiu-Chuang DEPPMAN

8. Pop Music

8a. K-pop, the Sound of Subaltern Cosmopolitanism? Hyunjoon SHIN

8b. The legendary live venues and the changing music scenes in Taipei and Beijing: Underworld and D22, Miaoju JIAN

9. Social media and popular activism

9a. Social Media and Popular Activism in a Korean Context, Dong Hyun SONG

9b. Mobilizing Discontent: Social Media and Networked Activism since the Great East Japan Earthquake, Love KINDSTRAND, Keiko NISHIMURA, and David H. SLATER

9c. Social media in China: between an emerging civil society and commercialization, Jens Damm

View III: Gender. Sexuality and Asian celebrity

10. East Asian stars, – public space and star studies, Jocelyn Yi-Hsuan LAI

11. Ribbons and Frills: Shōjo Sensibility and the Transnational Imaginary, Jinhee CHOI

12. Queer Pop Culture in the Sinophone Mediasphere, Fran MARTIN

13. Male and Female Idols of the Chinese Pornosphere, Katrien JACOBS

14. Soft, Smooth with Chocolate Abs: Performance of a Korean Masculinity in Taiwanese Men’s Fashion, Hong-Chi SHIAU

Part IV: Politics of the commons

15. Shanzhai culture, Dafen art and Copyrights, Jeroen de KLOET and Yiu Fai CHOW

16. Regional soft power/creative industries competition, Beng Huat CHUA

17. Popular Culture and Historical Memories of War in Asia, Rumi SAKAMOTO

18. Film Festivals and Regional Cosmopolitanism in East Asia: the case of Busan International Film Festival, Soojeong AHN

19. Trans-East-Asia as method, Koichi IWABUCHI

https://www.routledge.com/Routledge-Handbook-of-East-Asian-Popular-Culture/Iwabuchi-Tsai-Berry/p/book/9780415749428

 

Made in Korea: Studies in Popular Music – Edited by Hyunjoon Shin, Seung-Ah Lee

Made in Korea: Studies in Popular Music (Hardback) book cover

Made in Korea: Studies in Popular Music serves as a comprehensive and thorough introduction to the history, sociology, and musicology of contemporary Korean popular music. Each essay covers the major figures, styles, and social contexts of pop music in Korea, first presenting a general description of the history and background of popular music in Korea, followed by essays, written by leading scholars of Korean music, that are organized into thematic sections: History, Institution, Ideology; Genres and Styles; Artists; and Issues.

Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction: The Road to Popular Music: Regulation, Resistance, and Negotiations

HYUNJOON SHIN & SEUNG-AH LEE

 

Part I. Histories

1 The Stage Show and the Dance Floor: A History of “Live Music” in Korea

HYUNJOON SHIN

2 Assembling Pop Records in Twentieth Century Korea: A Double is Twice as Good as a Single

KEEWOONG LEE

3 Broadcasting Media and Popular Music: Institution, Technologies, and Power

JUNG-YUP LEE

4 Emerging Social Distribution: The Case of K-pop Circulation in the Global Pop Market

SUN JUNG

Part II. Genres

5 Trot and Ballad: Popular Genres of Korean Pop

YU-JEONG CHANG

6 Korean Rock’s Journey from Group Sound to Indie Rock

PIL HO KIM

7 Modern Folksong and People’s Song (Minjung Kayo)

AEKYUNG PARK

8 Korean Black Music and its Culture: Soul, Funk and Hip-Hop

JAEYOUNG YANG

Part III. Artists

9 Kim Hae-song, An Incomplete Dream of Korean Jazz

JUNHEE LEE

10 Shin Joong Hyun’s Rock Sonority and Korean Pentatonicism in “Miin”

DOHEE KWON

11 Kim Min-ki and the Making of a Legend

OKON HWANG

12 Seo Taiji Syndrome: Rise of Korean Youth and Cultural Transformation through Global Pop Music Styles in the early 1990s

EUN-YOUNG JUNG

Part IV. Issues

13 Korean Pop Music and Korean Identities: A Political-Cultural History of Korean Pop Music and Its Use of Traditional Korean Musical Elements

HYUNSEOK KWON

14 Who’s Afraid of Korean Idols?: Five Keywords for Understanding Korean Idol Pop

DONG-YEUN LEE

15 Controlling or Supporting?: A History of Cultural Policies on Popular Music

SOOJIN KIM

16 The Voice of Popular Korea: Styles, Genres and Contexts

HAEKYUNG UM

Coda

17 Asia and Beyond: Circulation and Reception of Korean Popular Music outside of Korea

SUNHEE KOO & SANG-YEON LOISE SUNG

Afterword

“We tried to catch up, now we should evolve”: A Conversation with Shin Hae-chul

HYUNJOON SHIN & CH’OE CHI-SŎN

https://www.routledge.com/Made-in-Korea-Studies-in-Popular-Music/Shin-Lee/p/book/9781138793033

Made in Japan: Studies in Popular Music Edited by Toru Mitsui

Made in Japan: Studies in Popular Music
Edited by Toru Mitsui (Routeledge 2014)

Made-in-Japan-coverMED-e1438056480641

Introduction: Embracing the West and Creating a Blend Tōru Mitsui
Part 1. Putting Japanese Popular Music in Perspective
1. The Takarazuka Revue: Its Star System and Fans’ Support Naomi Miyamoto
2. “The Infinite Power of Song”: Uniting Japan at the 60th Annual Kōhaku Song Contest Shelley Brunt
3. The Culture of Popular Music in Occupied Japan Mamoru Tōya
4. The Birth of Enka Yūsuke Wajima
5. Songs in Triple Time Are Still Sung in Duple TimeTōru MitsuiPart 2. Rockin’ Japan
6. From Covers to Originals: “Rockabilly” in 1956-1963 Terumasa Shimizu
7. The Development of Japanese Rock: A Bourdieuan Analysis Katsuya Minamida
8. A History of Japanese Rock Festivals and Live Music Venues Jun’ichi Nagai
Part 3. Japanese Popular Music and Visual Arts
9. Tōru Takemitsu’s Seigenki: An Anti-experimental, Tonal Film Score Kyōko Koizumi
10. The Interaction Between Music and Visuals in Animated Movies: A Case Study of Akira Hideko Haguchi
11. The Emergence of Singing Voice Actors/Actresses: The Crossover Point of the Music Industry and the Animation Industry Akira YamasakiCoda: Japanese Music Reception
12. J-pop Goes the World: A New Global Fandom in the Age of Digital Media Yoshitaka Mōri
AFTERWORD
13. Maintaining Artistic Integrity and Creative Control: A Conversation with Tatsurō Yamashita Kiyoshi Matsuo and Tōru Mitsui
A Selected Bibliography on Japanese Popular Music
Notes on Contributors