CFP on Feminist Hip Hop Scholarship

Subject: Call for Papers: “All Hail the Queenz: A Queer Feminist Recalibration of Hip Hop Scholarship”

Call for Papers:

“All Hail the Queenz: A Queer Feminist Recalibration of Hip Hop Scholarship”

A Special Issue of *Women and Performance: A Journal of Feminist Theory*.

Issue Guest Editors: Shanté Paradigm Smalls (University of New Mexico) and
Jessica N. Pabón (New York University)**

Submission deadline: *May 1, 2013*

*Women and Performance *invites submissions for a special issue, “All Hail
the Queenz: A Queer Feminist Recalibration of Hip Hop Scholarship.” The
editors welcome scholarly articles and performative texts that foreground
feminist and queer performance studies approaches to hip hop culture,
consumption, and production.

Contemporary rap music, as a stand-in for hip hop culture and production,
is virtually synonymous with misogyny and homophobia in the mainstream US
and academic imaginary. We want to explore the range of understandings and
theories that inform how women and queers experience hip hop culture and
performance; this issue underscores the multiplicity of hip hop culture and
rejects a myopic totalizing view of what “the culture” does and is. We seek
to engage with the wide range of hip hop scholars and practitioners working
at the intersections of various methodologies not always associated with
scholarly considerations of hip hop (including psychoanalysis, feminist and
queer theory, and performance theory), as well as methods typical to hip
hop studies—sociology, Black studies, literature, history, musicology, and
urban studies. An emerging class of hip hop scholars pressure the givens of
race, gender, performance, sexuality, region, nationality, artistry, and
iconography—as a culture that has been in a state of constant development
for the past forty years, hip hop scholarship is more than due for a queer
feminist remixing and reimagining.

As coeditors, we challenge the readers of *Women & Performance* to ask:
What would a specifically queer feminist performance studies approach to
hip hop’s culture and production generate in terms of scholarship? How does
a queer feminist experience and critique revise hip hop studies? Why has
performance studies had so little to say about hip hop, what interventions
does performance studies yield? The issue’s focus on producing knowledge
about hip hop culture that centralizes women, girls and queer people will
include a range of elements, both popular and subcultural: DJ culture,
dance, graffiti, human beat boxing, rap music, as well as fashion, media
and print, organizing, and other forms of knowledge production. No matter
the genre, hip hop is often conceived and misrepresented as a
male-dominated culture which casts women and girls as an addendum to hip
hop rather than as primary producers, critics, and consumers. Within the
pages of this issue, contributors revisit the centrality of feminist and
queer artists to the production of all elements of hip hop culture and of
feminist and queer critique to hip hop scholarship. “All Hail the Queenz”
intends to tease out the nuanced negotiations women, girls, and queer
people develop as hip hop artists, critics, and consumers participating
within this climate.

Through re-centering feminist and queer critiques and female and queer
performance, “All Hail the Queenz” recalibrates hip hop’s center. By
recalibrating the center, contributors to this issue refashion hip hop
historiography and hip hop aesthetics beyond the art of rapping by the
cisgendered male body. In a kind of textual reperformance, this issue takes
its title from Queen Latifah’s lyrical demands for respect on her first
womanist rap classic album, “All Hail the Queen,” and reminds readers once
again that “stereotypes, they got to go!”

Potential Topics:

– Alternate Hip Hop historiographies
– Artist Scholars
– DJing, technology, gender, sexuality
– Feminist, queer, trans* aesthetics
– Feminist, queer, trans* pedagogy
– Graffiti and gender/sexuality
– Hip Hop culture and dis/ability
– Hip Hop diasporas
– Hip Hop fashion
– Hip Hop feminism
– Hip Hop festivals
– Hip Hop’s hybridity
– Human Beatboxing
– Media culture and social networking
– Nation, Empire, and hip hop
– Queer feminist hip hop critique
– Queerness and/in/of hip hop
– Trans* in/and hip hop

Article submissions should be 6-8,000 words in length and adhere to the
current Chicago Manual of Style (CMS), author-date format. Performative
texts should be 2-3,000 words and in any style the author chooses (same CMS
style as above if using citations). Photo essays are welcome. Questions and
abstracts for review are welcome before the final deadline.

Complete essays and texts for consideration must be submitted by 11:59 PM
EST, May 1, 2013.

Please send all work to both Shanté Paradigm Smalls and Jessica N.
Pabón via email (MSWord attachment): shantesmalls@gmail.comand
jnp250@nyu.edu.

Further submission guidelines may be found at:
http://www.womenandperformance.org/submission.html. *Women and Performance* is a
peer reviewed journal published by Routledge, Taylor & Francis.

Thanks for circulating!

Best,

Jessica N. Pabón

ABD, Performance Studies New York University
American Association of University Women Dissertation Fellow, 2012-2013
Curator, bob bar gallery, NYC
Email: jnp250@nyu.edu
Blog: artofgettingovaries.wordpress.com
Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/ArtofGettingOvaries
TedxWomen Talk: http://tedxwomen.org/speakers/jessica-pabon/

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CFP: K-pop politics: digital mediation and global fandom

The K-pop frenzy is anything but ordinary. On May 1 this year, some 300 French fans holding Korean national flags gathered in front of the Louvre Museum, calling for additional K-pop concerts to be held in Paris. Similar rallies ensued in London’s Trafalgar Square, Poland’s Warsaw, and Colombia’s Bolívar Square.
Though on a continuum with Hallyu (the Korean Wave), K-Pop departs from the earlier waves of Korean popular culture in its media specificity, geographic scope and generational focus. Preceding currents of Korean popular culture had centered on the cult of Korean television dramas distributed through conventional mass media (terrestrial, satellite, and cable televisions) to neighboring countries such as Japan, China, Taiwan, Vietnam, etc. The K-pop craze, however, is beyond “Asian” bounds. This year alone, K-pop concerts were held in L.A., New York, Paris, London, Sydney, Tokyo, etc., and K-Pop flash mobs continue to take place in such metropolises as Singapore, Lima, Sao Paulo, Toronto, Jakarta, Vancouver, Dublin, Bergen, and Rome.
The global K-pop rage is concurrent with and indebted to the rise of portable devices and what are known as social media. The effect is noticeable in the increased focus on visual aspects of K-pop. For example, South Korean singer Psy’s comic music video “Gangnam Style” has gone viral since it was released on July 15. The video surpassed 100 million hits on You Tube as of Sept 4, 2012, marking it the most-viewed video in such a short period of time. Social media, or social networking services (SNS), play a critical role in this. Songs shared through SNS strengthen online camaraderie, empower those who upload or distribute them, all the while bringing visual and musical experiences on individuated media to a new level.
Catalyzed by Twitter, Facebook, You Tube and online fan club sites, K-pop has emerged as an unambiguous instance of global digital youth culture: a social media-friendly, fan/user-steered, and participation-conducive anthropological occurrence. A unique amalgamation of dance, storytelling, persona, costume play, music, and fashion show, K-pop epitomizes a meta-genre performance in its own right. Accordingly, the cultural ownership or origin/ality of K-pop becomes a moot question, as it consciously espouses a hybridized mode of production. A bold concoction of styles, tunes, and languages borrowed from Europe, America and Japan, K-pop has spawned abundance of derivative local cultures: cover dance competitions, club parties, and fan club conventions.
Despite the transnational thrust, a dominant mode of production in K-pop remains “Korean.” A legion of similar idol bands has cropped up in less than ten years, and they are invariably manufactured and merchandised by a few Korean entertainment agencies. It is often claimed that the omnipotence of those management giants smothers artistic agency with what is known as a “slave contract,” which has sparked major controversies over labor and human right issues of K-pop performers. Fans do chime in and “meddle” with the mis/management of the stars they root for, as attested by the passionate support for JYJ’s debut, a group that broke out of TVXQ. Keenly aware of the growing clout of global fans, the leading management moguls (SM, YG, and JYP) make desperate efforts to stay on good terms with the K-pop devotees.
Aside from the tension between producers and consumers, K-pop has enjoyed a long, unperturbed honeymoon with capital and state power. Since the late 1990s, when entertainment business as a whole was designated as a strategic industry for South Korea, the K-pop enterprise has been a faithful ally to the reign of capital, commodity, fame and nationalist ideology. More often than not, K-pop industry would act as a cheerleader for various state and market affairs in exchange for policy support from various state bureaus and lavish underwritings from conglomerates like Samsung and LG, IT behemoths seeking to cash in on the soaring value of the nation’s cultural capital. Complicit with this state-corporate joint maneuver are ordinary citizens, intellectuals, artists, and mainstream media, whose postcolonial aspiration to see the nation exit from cultural obscurity hazardously awakens nationalist urges intrinsic to the state and capital-led Hallyu/K-pop campaign.
All of the instances necessitate a rigorous politicization of the seemingly innocuous popular music vogue. Hence, the proposed volume asks: what political desire and historical impetus do we find from the unruly diffusion of K-pop; what cultural risks and social stakes do fans in Europe, North America, Latin America, and South East Asia have in espousing the popular culture from a cultural periphery; how is this related to the global disenfranchisement of the youth under the sway of neoliberalism, how does the rise of K-pop respond to global racism and/or cosmopolitanism in culture, and how does it help boost the visibility of ethnic/cultural minorities at large; in what ways does the instance of K-pop inform or contest the conceptual underpinnings of cultural imperialism, cultural globalization, hybridity, transnationalism and traveling culture; what forms of cultural interaction and alliance do social media galvanize through the viral dissemination of K-pop, and what types of cultural authority and social institutions do they play havoc with; how does the K-pop industry establish esthetic and affective connections with ethno-cultural and artistic communities in other parts of the world; what cultural effects does K-pop wreak on other popular cultures as well as on other music genres, domestically and internationally; what correlations or affinities are there between the composite esthetics of K-pop and new forms of communication afforded by social network services; and how does the mediated experience of K-pop facilitate transnational or local cultural practices in such fields as language acquisition, tourism, commodity consumption, plastic surgery, concert-going, friend-making, and so forth?
With these questions in mind, the volume seeks to bring together academic and professional writings on the following areas.
1. Cultural/Political Frameworks: hallyu (Korean wave) and cultural nationalism/transnationalism; European crises; cultural de-westernization; cultural empowerment and global south, etc.
2. Political Economy: state/corporate sponsorship; soft power; nation branding; cultural diplomacy; popular culture as a strategic industry; transnationalism in cultural production, etc.
3. History and Stylistics: history of idol bands; esthetic genealogy of K-pop; group performance and collective identity; linguistic miscegenation; body/gender/sexuality; genre mix; kinship with J-pop or hip hop, etc.
4. Media and Mediation: specific workings and functions of You Tube, Twitter, and Facebook vis-à-vis broadcast mass media; distinct routes/patterns of distribution; specific meaning of “social” media in K-pop; digital mobility and transferability; viral communication and cultural synchronicity, etc.
5. Audience and Fandom: the power of fan clubs/blogs/sites; fan as expert/critic/quasi-manager; metropolitan subculture and the role of minorities/diasporas/sojourners; collectivity and peer culture; cultural capital and race/ethnicity; the meaning of entertainment in generational/youth culture; Japanophile and K-pop; anti-Korean wave movements; K-pop and consumption chains including, but not limited to, fashion, cosmetics, food, and tourism, etc.
The volume will be co-edited by JungBong Choi (NYU) & Roald Maliangkay (Australian National University). In order to be considered, please send your abstract (500~750 words) to JungBong Choi (jbc7@nyu.edu) by Friday, November 2, 2012. Your abstract must include working title, bibliography, and author’s bio (100 words).
The K-pop frenzy is anything but ordinary. On May 1 this year, some 300 French fans holding Korean national flags gathered in front of the Louvre Museum, calling for additional K-pop concerts to be held in Paris. Similar rallies ensued in London’s Trafalgar Square, Poland’s Warsaw, and Colombia’s Bolívar Square.
Though on a continuum with Hallyu (the Korean Wave), K-Pop departs from the earlier waves of Korean popular culture in its media specificity, geographic scope and generational focus. Preceding currents of Korean popular culture had centered on the cult of Korean television dramas distributed through conventional mass media (terrestrial, satellite, and cable televisions) to neighboring countries such as Japan, China, Taiwan, Vietnam, etc. The K-pop craze, however, is beyond “Asian” bounds. This year alone, K-pop concerts were held in L.A., New York, Paris, London, Sydney, Tokyo, etc., and K-Pop flash mobs continue to take place in such metropolises as Singapore, Lima, Sao Paulo, Toronto, Jakarta, Vancouver, Dublin, Bergen, and Rome.
The global K-pop rage is concurrent with and indebted to the rise of portable devices and what are known as social media. The effect is noticeable in the increased focus on visual aspects of K-pop. For example, South Korean singer Psy’s comic music video “Gangnam Style” has gone viral since it was released on July 15. The video surpassed 100 million hits on You Tube as of Sept 4, 2012, marking it the most-viewed video in such a short period of time. Social media, or social networking services (SNS), play a critical role in this. Songs shared through SNS strengthen online camaraderie, empower those who upload or distribute them, all the while bringing visual and musical experiences on individuated media to a new level.
Catalyzed by Twitter, Facebook, You Tube and online fan club sites, K-pop has emerged as an unambiguous instance of global digital youth culture: a social media-friendly, fan/user-steered, and participation-conducive anthropological occurrence. A unique amalgamation of dance, storytelling, persona, costume play, music, and fashion show, K-pop epitomizes a meta-genre performance in its own right. Accordingly, the cultural ownership or origin/ality of K-pop becomes a moot question, as it consciously espouses a hybridized mode of production. A bold concoction of styles, tunes, and languages borrowed from Europe, America and Japan, K-pop has spawned abundance of derivative local cultures: cover dance competitions, club parties, and fan club conventions.
Despite the transnational thrust, a dominant mode of production in K-pop remains “Korean.” A legion of similar idol bands has cropped up in less than ten years, and they are invariably manufactured and merchandised by a few Korean entertainment agencies. It is often claimed that the omnipotence of those management giants smothers artistic agency with what is known as a “slave contract,” which has sparked major controversies over labor and human right issues of K-pop performers. Fans do chime in and “meddle” with the mis/management of the stars they root for, as attested by the passionate support for JYJ’s debut, a group that broke out of TVXQ. Keenly aware of the growing clout of global fans, the leading management moguls (SM, YG, and JYP) make desperate efforts to stay on good terms with the K-pop devotees.
Aside from the tension between producers and consumers, K-pop has enjoyed a long, unperturbed honeymoon with capital and state power. Since the late 1990s, when entertainment business as a whole was designated as a strategic industry for South Korea, the K-pop enterprise has been a faithful ally to the reign of capital, commodity, fame and nationalist ideology. More often than not, K-pop industry would act as a cheerleader for various state and market affairs in exchange for policy support from various state bureaus and lavish underwritings from conglomerates like Samsung and LG, IT behemoths seeking to cash in on the soaring value of the nation’s cultural capital. Complicit with this state-corporate joint maneuver are ordinary citizens, intellectuals, artists, and mainstream media, whose postcolonial aspiration to see the nation exit from cultural obscurity hazardously awakens nationalist urges intrinsic to the state and capital-led Hallyu/K-pop campaign.
All of the instances necessitate a rigorous politicization of the seemingly innocuous popular music vogue. Hence, the proposed volume asks: what political desire and historical impetus do we find from the unruly diffusion of K-pop; what cultural risks and social stakes do fans in Europe, North America, Latin America, and South East Asia have in espousing the popular culture from a cultural periphery; how is this related to the global disenfranchisement of the youth under the sway of neoliberalism, how does the rise of K-pop respond to global racism and/or cosmopolitanism in culture, and how does it help boost the visibility of ethnic/cultural minorities at large; in what ways does the instance of K-pop inform or contest the conceptual underpinnings of cultural imperialism, cultural globalization, hybridity, transnationalism and traveling culture; what forms of cultural interaction and alliance do social media galvanize through the viral dissemination of K-pop, and what types of cultural authority and social institutions do they play havoc with; how does the K-pop industry establish esthetic and affective connections with ethno-cultural and artistic communities in other parts of the world; what cultural effects does K-pop wreak on other popular cultures as well as on other music genres, domestically and internationally; what correlations or affinities are there between the composite esthetics of K-pop and new forms of communication afforded by social network services; and how does the mediated experience of K-pop facilitate transnational or local cultural practices in such fields as language acquisition, tourism, commodity consumption, plastic surgery, concert-going, friend-making, and so forth?
With these questions in mind, the volume seeks to bring together academic and professional writings on the following areas.
1. Cultural/Political Frameworks: hallyu (Korean wave) and cultural nationalism/transnationalism; European crises; cultural de-westernization; cultural empowerment and global south, etc.
2. Political Economy: state/corporate sponsorship; soft power; nation branding; cultural diplomacy; popular culture as a strategic industry; transnationalism in cultural production, etc.
3. History and Stylistics: history of idol bands; esthetic genealogy of K-pop; group performance and collective identity; linguistic miscegenation; body/gender/sexuality; genre mix; kinship with J-pop or hip hop, etc.
4. Media and Mediation: specific workings and functions of You Tube, Twitter, and Facebook vis-à-vis broadcast mass media; distinct routes/patterns of distribution; specific meaning of “social” media in K-pop; digital mobility and transferability; viral communication and cultural synchronicity, etc.
5. Audience and Fandom: the power of fan clubs/blogs/sites; fan as expert/critic/quasi-manager; metropolitan subculture and the role of minorities/diasporas/sojourners; collectivity and peer culture; cultural capital and race/ethnicity; the meaning of entertainment in generational/youth culture; Japanophile and K-pop; anti-Korean wave movements; K-pop and consumption chains including, but not limited to, fashion, cosmetics, food, and tourism, etc.
The volume will be co-edited by JungBong Choi (NYU) & Roald Maliangkay (Australian National University). In order to be considered, please send your abstract (500~750 words) to JungBong Choi (jbc7@nyu.edu) by Friday, November 2, 2012. Your abstract must include working title, bibliography, and author’s bio (100 words).

**Updated CFP** Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Conference (Deadline: January 31, 2012)

THE 3rd INTER-ASIA POPULAR MUSIC STUDIES CONFERENCE (2012, TAIPEI)

CALL FOR PAPERS Updated! With Proposal Form and Hotel Info

Proposal Deadline: January 31, 2012

DATE: July 13 (Fri) – 15 (Sun), 2012

VENUE: National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan

ORGANIZERS:

*Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Group (https://interasiapop.org/)

*Graduate Institute of Mass Communication, National Taiwan Normal University

*Department of Psychology, Fu Jen Catholic University

STATEMENT:

We are pleased to announce the 3rd Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies (IAPMS) Conference, which will take place on July 13-15, 2012 in Taipei, in collaboration with the Department of Psychology at Fu Jen Catholic University and the Graduate Institute of Mass Communication at National Taiwan Normal University. Following the first conference in Osaka in 2008 and the second conference in Hong Kong in 2010, we move our next meeting to Taipei—hub of vibrant indie music scenes and Mandarin pop music industries.

The studies on Asian popular music are still in its embryonic stage. There is neither a university program in Asia devoted to popular music studies nor a journal dedicated to the exploration of Asian popular music. What we have now is an online-based, transnational research portal that began in 2007, the Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Group, plus a rapidly expanding research network that at the moment includes 80 scholars not only in Asia but also in Europe, America and Oceania. The organization is young and enthusiastic about the rising academic interest in Asian popular music both inside and outside Asia. There is a growing feeling that Asian popular music has not received sufficient attention from international popular music studies and that the existing paradigms of popular music studies may not be adequate in understanding the culture, economies, and histories of Asian popular music. The IAPMS biennial conference is meant to foster scholarly conversations surrounding the emerging field of Inter-Asia popular music studies.

CONFERENCE THEME:

WAYS OF LISTENING: How do we listen to pop music in/from Asia, and how can we talk about it?

Pop music lovers, makers, and critics take the activity of listening to music for granted. Yet it is not always easy to express our/my listening experiences to others. It is even more challenging to elaborate the social and cultural implications of the differing responses.

Can the question, “how do we listen to pop music” prompt interest in the “ways of listening”?

For example, who is listening to Asian pop music? What constitutes pop music listening? Where does music-listening take place? What activities and connections accompany the act of listening? How is everyday life organized through music listening? What personal, social, affective, and technological experiments have seeped through pop music listening? How do the recording and consumer’s technologies affect the ways of listening in contemporary and historical Asian contexts? Do musicians and critics listen to music and do they do music differently from “ordinary” music fans? Can music listening be creative practices? How are the ways of listening linked to various moments and results of production? How have listening and interpretive practices transformed Asian pop music as social distinction, identity markers, professional knowledge, genres, businesses, and markets?

We invite paper proposals that will investigate, elaborate, contextualize, and historicize the experiences of listening to (Asian) pop music globally and/or in Asia. We welcome papers that address moments that open up to expression and conversation about how people engage pop music. Since this could be a task beyond the measure of words, we invite you to turn the thematic question around with an attitude, such as, “Hey! This is how “we/I/they” action Asian pop music!”

We welcome both individual paper and panel proposals under the umbrella theme. In addition, we welcome individual and panel proposals for the following panel themes geared toward publication projects:

-Current issues in Asian popular music studies

-Research methodologies for the studies of Asian popular music

-Pop music, cultural variability and globalization

M.A. and Ph.D. students: IAPMS∙2012∙Taipei features a postgraduate day! Please consider submitting a proposal!

HOW TO SUBMIT PROPOSALS:

The organizers of IAPMS∙2012∙Taipei would like to invite interested participants to send your abstracts of no more than 250 words to iapms2012taipei@gmail.com before January 31, 2012.

We welcome individual and panel proposals from scholars, students, and industry practitioners. Please include the following information when submitting an individual or panel proposal:

(1)       Paper title

(2)       Panel title (optional)

(3)       Name(s)

(4)       Affiliation(s)

(5)       Address(es)

(6)       Email(s)

(7)       Postgraduate session(optional)

(8)       Short bio (max. 100 words)

(9)       Proposal abstract (max. 250 words). Panel organizers, please submit all individual abstracts. There is no need to submit a panel description.

(10)    Keywords (up to 5 words)

LANGUAGE: Given the diverse languages spoken in Asia, English will be the working language for the conference. Given the presence of many bilingual and multi-lingual speakers in Asia, translation service may become available during Q/A, upon request. We welcome multi-lingual participants to volunteer their service. Please contact us if you are willing to help.

Please email all inquiries to: iapms2012taipei@gmail.com

TIMELINE AND DEADLINES

2011.08.31           Announcing call-for-papers

2012.01.31           Deadline for submitting proposals

2012.02.29           Announcing accepted proposals

2012.03.31           Announcing conference program and information on

registration, travel, and accommodation

2012.06.31           Deadline for submitting full papers

2012.07.13           Conference begins

2012.07.15           Conference ends

REGISTRATION FEE

Waged members: NT$ 800 (=US$ 30)

Unwaged members: NT$ 400 (=US$ 15)

ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

Tunghung HO (Fu-jen Catholic University, Taiwan)

Eva TSAI (National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan)

Miao-Ju JIAN (National Chung-Cheng University, Taiwan)

Anthony FUNG (Chinese University, Hong Kong/China)

Yoshitaka MORI (Tokyo University of the Arts, Japan)

Kai Khiun LIEW (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)

Yukie HIRATA (Dokkyo University, Japan)

Hyunjoon SHIN (Sungkonghoe University, Korea)

Jung-Yup LEE (University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA/Korea)

NOTES

Please observe that this conference is scheduled after the ACS Crossroads 2012 Conference in Paris (July 2-6, 2012). For more information on that conference please go to: http://www.crossroads2012.org/?q=en/node/26

Hotels and Hostels Within 15-Minute Walk from NTNU:
1. Dolamanco Hotel, (Xinyi Rd., across from Daan Park, near Yongkang Jie), US $68-$70 for a double room.
Tel: +886-2-2700-1200
Website: http://www.dolamanco.com.tw/en/index.php
2.Dandy Hotel(Xinyi St., across from Daan Park, near Yongkang Jie), US $73-$75 for a standard room.
Tel: +886-2-27076899
Website: http://www.dandyhotel.com.tw/EN/DandyD/index.aspx
3. Rido Hotel (Xinyi Rd., across from Daan Park, near Yongkang Jie), US $ 81-$93 for a room depending on the theme.

Tel: +886-2-2706-5600

Website: http://www.rido.com.tw/about_en.php

3. NTNU Hall, (on campus, MRT Taipower Building Station or MRT Guting Station), US $36-$40 for a room. Curfew restriction 11:30pm-6:00am. Can accommodate if the guest needs to catch an early flight. We can reserve for you and get a discount.

Tel: +886-2-77345800
Website: http://140.122.109.88/eweb/

4. NTNU Guesthouse, (on campus, MRT Taipower Building Station or MRT Guting Station), US $75-$85 for a double room. Curfew restriction 11:30pm-6:00am. Can accommodate if the guest needs to catch an early flight. We can reserve for you and get a discount.

Tel: +886-2-77345800
Website: http://140.122.109.88/eweb/
5. Chocolate Box Backpackers Hostel(PuCheng St., MRT Taipower Building Station, close to Shida night market), US $16-$18 to US $43-$45 depending on the room type.
Tel: +886-988-618953 or  +886-2-23645848 (overseas)
Website: http://www.chocolatebox-backpackers.com/
6. Fun Taipei Backpacker Hostel (Shida Rd., MRT Taipower Building Station) US $16-$18 up.
Email: funtpe@gmail.com
Website: http://www.facebook.com/topic.php?uid=210438787841&topic=15509#!/profile.php?id=100000972543774
7. Tai-an Hotel (Heping E. Rd., MRT Guting Station), US $31-$32 for a single room. We can make a reservation for you.
Tel: +886-2-23910288 or +886-2-23214653 (no website)

Add: 2-4F., No.99, Sec. 1, Heping E. Rd., Da’an Dist., Taipei City
8. Tree House Hostel (Heping E. Rd., MRT Guting Station, close to Shida night market).
Email: tthhostel@gmail.com
Tel:+886-986-677837
Website: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Tree-House/107696675967182#!/pages/Tree-House/107696675967182?sk=info

9. Yo Xing Regency Hotel(Heping W. Rd., MRT Guting Station Exit No.8), online booking price US $60-62 for a double room.
Tel : +886-2-23943121
Website: http://en.yoxing.tw/
10. Howard Civil Service International House,(Xinsheng S. Rd., MRT Taipower Building Station Exit 2, close to Daan Park, Shida night market, and NTU campus), US $85-$87 for a standard single room.
Tel: +886-2-83691155
Website: http://intl-house.howard-hotels.com/?Lsn=2
11. Li Yuan Hotel (Roosevelt Rd., MRT Taipower Building Station Exit No.4, close to Shida night market). US$75-$77 for an executive room (lowest price).
Tel: +886-2-23657367
Website: http://www.liyuan.tw/room_en.php

12. Yo Yo Stay (at Shida night market). This hostel provides 4-person shared-studio(US$ 52-54) and 6-people-shared-room(US$32-34).

Tel: +886-966-222-041

Website: http://yoyostay.pixnet.net/blog

CFP: THE 3rd INTER-ASIA POPULAR MUSIC STUDIES CONFERENCE (Taipei, 2012)

DATE: July 13 (Fri) – 15 (Sun), 2012, featuring Postgraduate Sessions on July 13

VENUE: Lecture Hall (first floor) and Audio-Visual Room (second floor), Extension School of Continuing Education Building, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan

Campus map: http://www.ntnu.edu.tw/ga/map/images/ntnu_map2.jpg

ORGANIZERS:

Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Group (https://interasiapop.org/)

Department of Psychology, Fu Jen Catholic University

Graduate Institute of Mass Communication, National Taiwan Normal University

STATEMENT:

We are pleased to announce the 3rd Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies (IAPMS) Conference, which will take place on July 13-15, 2012 in Taipei, in collaboration with the Department of Psychology at Fu Jen Catholic University and the Graduate Institute of Mass Communication at National Taiwan Normal University. Following the first conference in Osaka in 2008 and the second conference in Hong Kong in 2010, we move our next meeting to Taipei—hub of vibrant indie music scenes and Mandarin pop music industries.

The studies on Asian popular music are still in its embryonic stage. There is neither a university program in Asia devoted to popular music studies nor a journal dedicated to the exploration of Asian popular music. What we have now is an online-based, transnational research portal that began in 2007, the Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Group, plus a rapidly expanding research network that at the moment includes 80 scholars not only in Asia but also in Europe, America and Oceania. The organization is young and enthusiastic about the rising academic interest in Asian popular music both inside and outside Asia. There is a growing feeling that Asian popular music has not received sufficient attention from international popular music studies and that the existing paradigms of popular music studies may not be adequate in understanding the culture, economies, and histories of Asian popular music. The IAPMS biennial conference is meant to foster scholarly conversations surrounding the emerging field of Inter-Asia popular music studies.

CONFERENCE THEME (IAPMS∙2012∙Taipei):

WAYS OF LISTENING: How do we listen to pop music in/from Asia, and how can we talk about it?

Pop music lovers, makers, and critics take the activity of listening to music for granted. Yet it is not always easy to express our/my listening experiences to others. It is even more challenging to elaborate the social and cultural implications of the differing responses.

Can the question, “how do we listen to pop music” prompt interest in the “ways of listening”?

For example, who is listening to Asian pop music? What constitutes pop music listening? Where does music-listening take place? What activities and connections accompany the act of listening? How is everyday life organized through music listening? What personal, social, affective, and technological experiments have seeped through pop music listening? How do the recording and consumer’s technologies affect the ways of listening in contemporary and historical Asian contexts? Do musicians and critics listen to music and do they do music differently from “ordinary” music fans? Can music listening be creative practices? How are the ways of listening linked to various moments and results of production? How have listening and interpretive practices transformed Asian pop music as social distinction, identity markers, professional knowledge, genres, businesses, and markets?

We invite paper proposals that will investigate, elaborate, contextualize, and historicize the experiences of listening to (Asian) pop music globally and/or in Asia. We welcome papers that address moments that open up to expression and conversation about how people engage pop music. Since this could be a task beyond the measure of words, we invite you to turn the thematic question around with an attitude, such as, “Hey! This is how “we/I/they” action Asian pop music!”

We welcome both individual paper and panel proposals under the umbrella theme. In addition, we welcome individual and panel proposals for the following panel themes geared toward publication projects:

-Current issues in Asian popular music studies

-Research methodologies for the studies of Asian popular music

-Pop music, cultural variability and globalization

M.A. and Ph.D. students: IAPMS∙2012∙Taipei features a postgraduate day! Please consider submitting a proposal!

HOW TO SUBMIT PROPOSALS:

The organizers of IAPMS∙2012∙Taipei would like to invite interested participants to send your abstracts of no more than 250 words to iapms2012taipei@gmail.com before January 31, 2012.

Please use the attached Proposal Form (right click to download) when submitting your proposal. If you plan to organize a panel with more than two people, please coordinate with the panelists to put all the necessary information on one form (e.g., panel title, paper titles, individual abstracts, panelists information). A panel description is not necessary.

LANGUAGE: Given the diverse languages spoken in Asia, English will be the working language for the conference. Given the presence of many bilingual and multi-lingual speakers in Asia, translation service may become available during Q/A, upon request. We welcome multi-lingual participants to volunteer their service. Please contact us if you are willing to help.

Please email all inquiries to: iapms2012taipei@gmail.com

TIMELINE AND DEADLINES

2011.08.31              Announcing call-for-papers

2012.01.31              Deadline for submitting proposals

2012.02.29              Announcing accepted proposals

2012.03.31              Announcing conference program and information on

registration, travel, and accommodation

2012.06.31              Deadline for submitting full papers

2012.07.13              Conference begins

2012.07.15              Conference ends

REGISTRATION FEE

Waged members: NT$ 800 (=US$ 30)

Unwaged members: NT$ 400 (=US$ 15)

ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

Tunghung HO (Fu-jen Catholic University, Taiwan)

Eva TSAI (National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan)

Miao-Ju JIAN (National Chung-Cheng University, Taiwan)

Anthony FUNG (Chinese University, Hong Kong/China)

Yoshitaka MORI (Tokyo University of the Arts, Japan)

Kai Khiun LIEW (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)

Yukie HIRATA (Dokkyo University, Japan)

Hyunjoon SHIN (Sungkonghoe University, Korea)

Jung-Yup LEE (University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA/Korea)

NOTES

Please observe that this conference is scheduled after the ACS Crossroads 2012 Conference in Paris. For more information on that conference please go to: http://www.crossroads2012.org/?q=en/node/26

CFP: Cultural Transformations: Development Initiatives and Social Movements (Inter-Asia Cultural Studies Society)

Cultural Transformations: Development Initiatives and Social Movements
The  bi-annual conference of the Inter Asia Cultural Studies Society (IACSS), which is engaged in exploring new ways to re-imagine the idea of Asia in the new century. Inter-disciplinary in nature, the conference will establish a dialogue between academics, practitioners, social and cultural activists from inside and outside the region to problematise the idea of Asia. The conference is being hosted by BRAC University and is organized by the Department of English and Humanities and BRAC Development Institute.

South Asia in Inter-Asia
This year’s conference will bring in South Asia more centrally within IACSS and also makes efforts to draw in scholars from West Asia into the fold of IACSS.  Hosted in Bangladesh, this conference will be able to shed light on groundbreaking innovations in the development arena, such as in education, livelihoods, health, etc.

New cultural forms and trends such as music, dance, film and popular literature, will bring out the mutual influences between cultural practice and economic and social development.

Envisioning a new picture of Asia – an other Asia – this conference invites paper and panel proposals on issues such as

  • Social movements and struggles
  • Development initiatives and cultural change
  • Asian feminisms and social change
  • The post-colonial, the national and the pan-Asian in the formation of new cultural identities
  • Changes and developments in popular cultural practices, including music, dance, film and popular literature
  • Other topics in Inter-Asia Cultural Studies are also welcome

Panels should comprise of 3-5 papers. Proposals for papers and panels will be submitted by the 31st of May 2011. Acceptance of panels will be announced by June 20 2011.

Proposals for papers and panels should include:

  • abstracts of papers (maximum 300 words)
  • panels proposals should include a session abstract, plus abstracts of individual papers
  • short biographical information, including institutional affiliation.

Please email paper and panel proposals to culturaltrans@bracu.ac.bd

Participants need to pay for their own travel and accommodation. However, accommodation in Dhaka will be arranged by the hosts.

A few small bursaries may be available, information for which will be posted later.

More information will be available on this website as we plan further.

http://www.bracu.ac.bd/event/culturaltransformations/

CFP: Inaugural East Asian Popular Culture Association Conference

CFP: Inaugural East Asian Popular Culture Association Conference

Location: Taiwan

Call for Papers Date: 2011-05-31

The EAPCA (East Asian Popular Culture Association), the newest branch of the PCA / ACA, will hold its inaugural conference in September 1 to 3, 2011 at National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan. The EAPCA invites proposals for panels and papers on popular culture in Asia, particularly in Taiwan. We encourage papers with imaginative perspectives and interpretations of popular culture as a medium to convey memories and history, as we hope to explore issues such as the way popular culture has been used to adopt meaning to the past events, how the global flow of popular culture changes the way people recognize their own history, and how the popular culture affect the socio-cultural map of East Asia. We welcome submissions for panels, roundtable discussions, workshops, and individual papers. As the language of the conference is English, the proposals should be in English as well. All submissions should be sent by email, with attachments in Word or PDF file format. Please write EAPCA proposal in the subject line. When submitting a panel proposal:

include a 150 200 words abstract of the panels theme

designate one panelist as contact personindicate audio/visual needs.

Each paper proposal, whether individual or part of a panel, should include for each participant:

one page abstract (including title)

short biography of the author

audio/visual needs

contact information of address, phone number, and email

The Program Committee assumes all members of proposed panels have agreed to participate.

The deadline for submissions is March 31, 2011.

Please email submissions to:

Dr. Yin C. Chuang

National Taiwan Normal University

Masashi Ichiki

Chikushi Jogakuen University

jun@chikushi-u.ac.jp

CFP: Perfect Beat will publish two special issues in 2011 on ‘trends in contemporary music in Asia’

Reminder: CALL FOR PAPERS
Perfect Beat will publish two special issues in 2011 on ‘trends in contemporary music in Asia’. The first issue (January 2011) concerns traditional, and contemporary fusion, hybrid and crosscultural musics of Asia, whereas the second issue (July 2011) will focus on the popular musics of Asia. While both of these special issues are open to a range of topics, articles which focus on the following themes are especially welcome:

• Cultural nationalism and music;
• Tradition and globalization;
• Networks and structures of patronage;
• Reconfigurations of the social structures of music;
• Media and digital culture;
• Cultural consequences of economic globalisation;
• Issues related to the mobility of people, musics, ideas and sounds;
• Innovative uses of technology and communication;
• New trends in performance practice.

Expressions of Interest
Intended contributors are asked to submit expressions of interest in order to identify the likely scope of material in the issue and to ensure priority consideration in the event of there being more material submitted than can be published. Expressions of interest should not exceed 300 words. Two guest editors have been commissioned to produce the special issues, and any further questions should be directed to them.

The deadline for expressions of interest for the January 2011 issue, edited by Dr Adrian McNeil, has lapsed, but expressions of interest concerning popular music in Asia remains open.

Please email Dr Shelley Brunt (Editor July 2011 issue) shelley.brunt@otago.ac.nz
Deadline for expressions of interest is 31 July 2010

Acceptance of abstracts does not guarantee publication.

——————–
Established in 1992, and published biannually, Perfect Beat is a research journal an international, peer-reviewed
journal published by Equinox Publishing (London). It is dedicated to the study of the music and cultures of indigenous
and Euro/Asian/North American migrant groups in the Pacific since the late 1800s.
For more information about the journal please go to: http://www.equinoxjournals.com/ojs/index.php